high school – SMLXtlarge http://www.smlxtralarge.com/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 18:05:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-5-150x150.png high school – SMLXtlarge http://www.smlxtralarge.com/ 32 32 From the Echo Press Archives, 1997: Underdog Cards win the first-ever basketball state title – Alexandria Echo Press https://www.smlxtralarge.com/from-the-echo-press-archives-1997-underdog-cards-win-the-first-ever-basketball-state-title-alexandria-echo-press/ Wed, 16 Mar 2022 18:05:00 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/from-the-echo-press-archives-1997-underdog-cards-win-the-first-ever-basketball-state-title-alexandria-echo-press/ This week in 1997 – 25 years ago: Headline: “Underdog Cards Win First-Ever Basketball State Title!” The Alexandria Cardinal Girls basketball team won the Minnesota State Class AAA Championship with a 52-43 win over Minneapolis North at Williams Arena. It was the eighth state championship in school history and the first-ever basketball crown for the […]]]>

This week in 1997 – 25 years ago: Headline: “Underdog Cards Win First-Ever Basketball State Title!” The Alexandria Cardinal Girls basketball team won the Minnesota State Class AAA Championship with a 52-43 win over Minneapolis North at Williams Arena. It was the eighth state championship in school history and the first-ever basketball crown for the girls. Trailing by 11 early in the game, Coach Wendy Kohler’s Cards held a 34-31 lead by the end of the third quarter and never gave up the lead thereafter. The Cards scored their last 11 points on the free throw line, freezing the heavily favored Polars out of the championship. The Cards’ stunning triumph capped a 25-3 season.

1972, 50 years ago: After a year’s absence, the drama department at St. Cloud State College is returning to its summer home near Alexandria. “We are ready to consider Theater L’Homme Dieu as an integral part of our theater program on a permanent basis,” said department head Dale Swanson in announcing the move. The theater opened in the summer of 1961 through the efforts of the Alexandria-St. Cloud State College Performing Arts Foundation, a nonprofit organization. It has been the setting for more than 90 plays over 10 successful seasons.

dr FL Pearson, Chairman of the Alexandria Airport Commission, announced plans are underway for additional hangars at Alexandria Airport. The city will soon solicit building bids. The exact number of seats to be made available to aircraft owners has not yet been decided. Pearson stated that the allocation of hangars would be on a first-come, first-served basis. If you are interested, reserve and email as soon as possible.

1997, 25 years ago: A jeweled cross, representing the importance of Christ, was placed atop the new St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Alexandria. The building’s inaugural Mass will be held on Palm Sunday, March 23rd.

organizer for Douglas County’s Habitat for Humanity are hoping to raise $40,000 to build a home. Founded last year in Douglas County, the chapter recently received its charter. Until then, the local organization was not allowed to collect donations. Habitat uses volunteers to build homes for people in need. Interest-free loans with 20-year repayment plans are offered. When the loans are repaid, the money will be used to build more houses.

2012, 10 years ago: Ten years ago the organization “Let’s Go Fishing” started with weekly fishing trips for two to three seniors. In 2011, the organization ministered to more than 18,000 people fishing with 28 chapters throughout Minnesota, including Alexandria. Volunteered by Let’s Go Fishing, the non-profit organization has a mission to enrich the lives of others and strengthen communities through fishing and boating excursions.

Just For Fun, 1947 – 75 years ago: Don L. Olson, a local high school faculty member, flew to Dayton, Ohio, where he procured approximately $15,000 in surplus Army Air Force equipment for the local school. All of these devices are provided to the school free of charge. Included are a milling machine, a precision lathe, three drill presses, two bench grinders, a band saw, multiple 16mm film cameras, small hand tools and electronics including receivers and transmitters.

Sports Trivia, 2012 – 10 years ago: The Vikingland Curling Club in Alexandria was founded in 2005 and currently has 68 members ranging in age from mid-20s to members in their 70s. The club is a non-profit group run by volunteers and supported through membership dues, fundraising events, sponsorships and donations. They ripple across four sheets of ice at the Runestone Community Center from October through early March. Membership Director is Jason Rauk.

Rachel Barduson, from Alexandria, is a regular columnist for the Echo Press Opinion page.

]]>
Russian club come together and raise funds to support Ukraine amid ongoing conflict – The Sagamore https://www.smlxtralarge.com/russian-club-come-together-and-raise-funds-to-support-ukraine-amid-ongoing-conflict-the-sagamore/ Mon, 14 Mar 2022 02:16:43 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/russian-club-come-together-and-raise-funds-to-support-ukraine-amid-ongoing-conflict-the-sagamore/ NATE PARRY LUFF/SAGAMORE STAFF Students gathered outside the STEM wing on Wednesday March 9 to raise funds for Ukrainian refugees and protest against Russian actions The Russian Club held a rally on the steps outside the atrium on March 9 at 7:50 a.m. to raise money for Cash For Refugees, a nonprofit that gives money […]]]>

NATE PARRY LUFF/SAGAMORE STAFF

Students gathered outside the STEM wing on Wednesday March 9 to raise funds for Ukrainian refugees and protest against Russian actions

The Russian Club held a rally on the steps outside the atrium on March 9 at 7:50 a.m. to raise money for Cash For Refugees, a nonprofit that gives money to refugees when they arrive in another country. Solidarity and strength beamed from the yellow and blue signs in front of the high school.

The Russian-Ukrainian conflict escalated into an invasion of Ukraine by Russian forces on February 24, triggering a global call for action on Ukraine’s behalf. Ukrainian citizens have been fleeing since the start of the invasion and an estimated 2 million people have fled Ukraine, according to National Public Radio (NPR).

The Russian club set up a table outside the science wing to sell baked goods while standing with signs and Ukrainian flags. College and guidance counselor and club counselor Lenny Libenzon said club members came up with the idea to raise funds following recent events.

Senior Julius Arolovitch said the fundraiser was aimed at supporting Ukrainian students and providing money for refugees fleeing Ukraine.

“We are trying to raise funds for an organization that is currently at the border giving out money to people who have just crossed,” Arolovitch said.

Despite the club’s emphasis on celebrating Russian culture, Arlovitch said most members did not support the war.

“In Russia there is a clear divide between people who support this and those who don’t and much of it is propaganda driven. But even in our Russian club there are a lot of people of Russian origin who really care about this conflict and about helping Ukraine, not Russia,” said Arolovitch.

Arolovitch said providing aid to Ukrainians through direct action is most important.

“Awareness is not as necessary as resources. Awareness is certainly necessary, but it’s been so heavily aired in the mainstream news that it’s kind of not our primary focus. What we really need is to help the people there,” Arolovitch said.

Libenzon said the administration has dealt with a variety of issues over the past month and will hopefully provide guidance regarding the Russian-Ukrainian war soon.

“There’s so much going on at school right now. The administration has its priorities, but I think it will also talk about them. It’s a good first step, which we did as a Russian club,” Libenzon said.

Libenzon said many high school students have been affected by the war, especially those who have friends or relatives in Russia and Ukraine.

“We had students whose parents had to evacuate and return. I know someone who just arrived last night,” Libenzon said. “A lot of people in Russia don’t support this war and a lot of people want to leave.”

]]>
To be serious about diversity, academic medicine must pay https://www.smlxtralarge.com/to-be-serious-about-diversity-academic-medicine-must-pay/ Mon, 28 Feb 2022 09:46:17 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/to-be-serious-about-diversity-academic-medicine-must-pay/ As I started interviewing for my first post-fellowship position as a neuro-oncologist, I immediately realized that I could work in private practice and earn a good salary or earn a lot less by choosing to work in a teaching hospital where I could do research and help train new doctors. Ultimately, I accepted a job […]]]>

As I started interviewing for my first post-fellowship position as a neuro-oncologist, I immediately realized that I could work in private practice and earn a good salary or earn a lot less by choosing to work in a teaching hospital where I could do research and help train new doctors. Ultimately, I accepted a job at a teaching hospital that gave me the time, resources, and support to pursue a career in health equity.

But as a first-generation Guyanese doctor, the decision wasn’t easy, especially when it came to salary.

I’m not alone. Every year, thousands of physicians must make this same decision when considering a career in academic medicine. But that weighs heavier on Black, Indigenous and People of Color (BIPOC) doctors, who are less likely to have generational wealth and often struggle with significant student debt. This is reflected in the makeup of today’s physician pool: Black, Latino, and Native American physicians make up 11.1% of the total physician population and 9.3% of medical school professors, though they represent 31.7% of the American population.

advertising

Although compensation is not the only barrier to diversity in academic medicine, it is one of the most important.

It is a privilege to be a doctor. It is also a privilege to be financially and professionally secure enough to embark on the path to becoming a doctor, which includes four years of medical school and a minimum of three years of residency, and lasts even longer for those who pursue doctorates or scholarships for some. specialties. And that doesn’t take into account what pre-med students often pursue to become competitive candidates, which can include years of volunteer work or service.

advertising

All this preparation costs money. This is not just the direct cost of medical education, but also additional costs for test prep, applications, and exams, not to mention travel costs for medical school interviews and residency.

Then there is the opportunity cost: years of lost income paying exorbitant tuition fees. Investing $300,000, the cost of attending many medical schools, in an index fund mirroring the S&P and achieving a 10.5% annual return would yield over $800,000 in 10 years.

For many, becoming a doctor remains a worthwhile investment. Once you’re in the club, you can make a better living than most Americans, though for many young doctors like me, that goal is long overdue. I used my credit cards to the max to pay for medical school interview travel expenses. The interest accrued until I could use the student loans I got to pay off my credit cards, trading one debt for another. Later, I used my resident and scholarship salary to pay expenses, start paying school loans, pay professional fees, and support my family. Student loans — which I’ll be paying off for another decade — are the most important accounts on my credit report and the biggest obstacle to buying my first home.

It was therefore a difficult decision to join the ranks of university medicine and accept a lower salary. It was a decision I could make because I come from a two income household. But many in my position cannot choose this option.

In recent years, there has been an emphasis on the importance of diversity within medicine, with many academic medical centers expressing sentiments in support of efforts for inclusion, diversity, equity, Anti-Racism and Social Justice (IDEAS).

BIPOC will continue to be underrepresented in this field for years to come, as the pool of future physicians reflects the nation’s current flawed institutions, with many students excluded from consideration for a medical career before the end of high school.

But I believe there are ways to start closing the representation gap between academic medicine and medical school faculty right now.

One solution is to increase the remuneration of university doctors. Although they generate less revenue for hospital systems and medical organizations than physicians who primarily see patients, conducting medical research and training new physicians is important work that deserves fair compensation. An overall increase in compensation would help make this career choice accessible to those without significant resources.

Another option is to target funds and grants to attract first-generation physicians or BIPOCs. This could be done as needed. New faculty hires might complete financial forms to determine their eligibility for this type of funding, or it might be done through a proxy indicator, such as qualifying for federal Pell Grants. Other programs could include strong loan repayment programs that work in addition to federal options, mortgage relief programs, housing subsidies, and signing bonuses.

Pay transparency is also important. I’m not just talking about total compensation, but what’s in it. BIPOC doctors support the “minority tax” and are often asked to take on many unpaid obligations, such as serving on diversity committees and anti-racism task forces. Although this is important work, it takes away time that could be spent on academic productivity or clinical work. The time and effort devoted to these committees and working groups must be remunerated.

Transparent salaries would also help close the gender pay gap. The Association of American Medical Colleges offers access to its faculty salary report for $1,150 for nonmembers; providing this service free of charge to potential and junior members would help to mitigate wage asymmetry.

Where will this money come from? This is where the country’s leading academic medical institutions must lead by example. Mass General Brigham, Mayo Clinic, Cleveland Clinic and Cedars-Sinai all reported hundreds of millions of dollars in operating revenue (profits) last year. More than 40 universities with endowments of more than $1 billion each are associated with medical schools. The combined endowments of Harvard, Yale, Stanford and the University of Pennsylvania total over $120 billion. Institutions like these have the money to invest in programs and initiatives that recruit and retain BIPOC faculty members.

National agencies must also lead by example, particularly in helping academic medical centers which may not have the financial flexibility to invest in support programmes. The National Institutes of Health, which provides a significant portion of research funding in the United States, has a consortium of diversity programs. Increased funding for this program could be used to support researchers from diverse backgrounds in institutions that lack financial resources. For teaching hospitals, the graduate medical education program under Medicare provides salaries for medical residents. Increased funding for this program could be used to support faculty diversity. Both of these suggestions build on the federal government’s ongoing commitment to improving diversity and advancing equity.

While solidarity statements emphasizing IDEAS are helpful, discussions are inexpensive. It’s time to pay.

Joshua A. Budhu is a neuro-oncology researcher at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and Massachusetts General Hospital, and a Commonwealth Fund Fellow in Minority Health Policy at Harvard University.

]]>
How an organization that received a $15 million gift from MacKenzie Scott is working to change mental health in schools https://www.smlxtralarge.com/how-an-organization-that-received-a-15-million-gift-from-mackenzie-scott-is-working-to-change-mental-health-in-schools/ Thu, 24 Feb 2022 09:25:14 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/how-an-organization-that-received-a-15-million-gift-from-mackenzie-scott-is-working-to-change-mental-health-in-schools/ As the United States faces a growing youth mental health crisis spurred by the coronavirus pandemic, a nonprofit focused on mental health in schools is stepping up efforts with a $15 million donation dollars from Amazon’s ex-wife Mackenzie Scott. Jeff Bezos. Scott, who has so far donated billions of dollars in his pledge to return […]]]>

As the United States faces a growing youth mental health crisis spurred by the coronavirus pandemic, a nonprofit focused on mental health in schools is stepping up efforts with a $15 million donation dollars from Amazon’s ex-wife Mackenzie Scott. Jeff Bezos.

Scott, who has so far donated billions of dollars in his pledge to return the majority of his wealth to society, donated $15 million earlier this month to the JED Foundation, which works with high schools and colleges across the country.

The money, the largest donation in the history of the JED Foundation, will allow the foundation to expand its work to reach more than 12 million students, according to JED Foundation CEO John MacPhee.

“We are aiming for large-scale impact across the country and his donation is going to help us get there faster,” MacPhee told “Good Morning America.” “Our goal is to triple the number of students we cover.”

Scott’s donation, which is unlimited, meaning the foundation can use it however it sees fit, comes at a time when the needs are “greater than ever” amid the pandemic, according to MacPhee

“Pupils haven’t been to school and now they’re coming back and the schools are just overwhelmed,” he said. “You could also say that schools are less equipped to be able to actually provide [mental health] support than they were before COVID-19, so we’re just hearing a huge need. »

Washington, DC and Idaho have one school psychologist for every 500 students, according to a report released last week by The Hopeful Futures Campaign, a coalition of organizations focused on mental health supports in schools. In some states, including West Virginia, Missouri, Texas, Alaska and Georgia, there is only one school psychologist for more than 4,000 students, according to the report.

In the final months of 2021, the US Surgeon General warned of a growing mental health crisis among young people, and organizations representing child psychiatrists, pediatricians and children’s hospitals declared a national mental health emergency. young people.

“As a parent and as a doctor, I am deeply concerned that the obstacles facing this generation of young people are unprecedented and particularly difficult to overcome and that the impact this is having on their mental health is devastating. “said US Surgeon General Vivek Murthy. before the senators in December.

As rates of anxiety and depression among young people rise, schools, where young people spend most of their days, can provide a unique safety net for identifying troubled children and offering support, according to MacPhee.

The JED Foundation does more than ensure that schools have mental health professionals. The goal of the foundation’s efforts, according to MacPhee, is to make mental health awareness and support a part of the schools’ culture.

“Everyone at school, everyone in the community has a role to play in supporting young people’s mental health and wellbeing,” he said. “It’s a culture of caring where there really is no wrong door, so it’s everyone’s responsibility to notice and support someone who might be in trouble.”

In New Jersey, the JED Foundation partnered with a high school that needed to change its mental health culture after two former students committed suicide during their freshman year of college.

The high school, Northern Highlands Regional High School in Allendale, New Jersey, sought assistance from the JED Foundation at the request of a parent, according to Dr. Jessica Verdicchio, Wellness and Equity Supervisor at the school.

“We’re a pretty successful district and there’s a lot of pressure around college and the type of college you go to and a lot of anxiety around academics and academic pressure,” Verdicchio said. “Our school community was not naive to the fact that we have and have had challenges.”

Verdicchio said the school’s partnership with the JED Foundation came at the right time.

“We’ve seen quite a significant increase in the number of students seeking services, even from last year to this year,” she said. “It’s been pretty busy, just to make sure our students feel heard and supported, but also connecting them to other resources, sometimes outside of school, and having conversations with families and students. .”

When the school began working with the JED Foundation last year, it created an interdisciplinary group of students, parents, teachers, administrators and alumni, led focus groups and conducted surveys to identify areas of change, according to Verdicchio.

Over the past year, the school has launched a series of lectures for parents on topics such as addiction and mental health. He also trained the entire student body of 1,300 members to identify students struggling with mental health issues and what to do about it, according to Verdicchio.

The school now also conducts quarterly mental health checks with each student and follows up to ensure they are put in touch with a counselor if they are struggling.

Additionally, the students have formed a wellness club, giving them even more of a role and voice in mental health support at school, according to Verdicchio.

“Our students really love having their voices heard,” she said. “They have tons of ideas for how we can continue to support student mental health, and I love hearing what they think works and what doesn’t.”

Verdicchio said mental health awareness is now “part of the fabric of our school.”

“With the JED partnership, what it has allowed us to do is to have a very clear vision of how this is supposed to work and to ensure that not only are pockets of people trained, but that all of our staff are trained, and that we are providing parent training and instilling language around mental health and how to cope and how to seek help as part of the fabric of our school,” she said. said “It made our school as a whole feel supported.”

How to ensure schools support children’s mental health

One of the “silver linings” of the coronavirus pandemic, according to MacPhee, is that it has sparked a bigger conversation about mental health and children, especially in schools.

Part of the change comes from parents who should feel empowered to ensure their children’s school is a healthy environment, according to MacPhee.

Here are four tips from MacPhee on how parents can get involved in supporting schools.

1. Ask for the schools plan to support mental health. “Every school should have a written plan outlining how it supports student mental health and how it reduces suicide,” MacPhee said, noting that schools should have plans to improve mental health.

2. Know the mental health resources available at your child’s school, including mental health professionals on staff and available trainings for staff, students and parents, recommends MacPhee. “In addition to academic support and college guidance, parents should also ask about mental health supports,” he said.

3. Make sure the school administration supports mental health efforts. “The message to the school leadership is that it has to be a priority, and they control its success by making it a school priority,” MacPhee said.

4. Ask how parents can get involved. “Mental health should be front and center with the parent-teacher association and other parent groups that are in the community,” MacPhee said.

]]>
Oakland is testing what happens when you give people $300 to ride the bus https://www.smlxtralarge.com/oakland-is-testing-what-happens-when-you-give-people-300-to-ride-the-bus%ef%bf%bc/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 00:01:22 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/oakland-is-testing-what-happens-when-you-give-people-300-to-ride-the-bus%ef%bf%bc/ Evonne Liang, a single mother who lives near Laney College, usually drives her car to work in downtown Oakland. She pays at least $14 to park, and constantly rising gas prices have forced her to look for deals wherever she can find them. His family budget is tight. “Any amount we can save helps. We […]]]>


Evonne Liang, a single mother who lives near Laney College, usually drives her car to work in downtown Oakland. She pays at least $14 to park, and constantly rising gas prices have forced her to look for deals wherever she can find them. His family budget is tight.

“Any amount we can save helps. We go to a nearby church that distributes food and clothing,” she said.

But a new free prepaid transit card has changed Liang’s mind about her commute. She now plans to take the bus to save money.

Called Universal Basic Mobility, the city’s Department of Transportation, or OakDOT, launched the free transit card program during the last week of December. OakDOT chose 500 people based on their income level and transportation needs. The $300 transit card is given out in two installments of $150 and can be used to pay for rides on AC Transit, BART, city bikes and scooters. The money for the Universal Basic Mobility program came from a $243,000 grant from the Alameda County Transportation Commission.

Over the next few months, OakDOT will collate survey responses from participants and use anonymous GPS data from their maps to plan for possible future expansions. Among the types of information the ministry is looking for is whether people change their travel behavior after receiving the grant and examining public transport habits to make better decisions about services. The map provider, Akimbo, says on its website that riders’ private location data is encrypted in such a way that it is unlikely to be hacked.

More than a dozen cardholders told The Oaklandside that the program has helped them get around and that even a few hundred extra dollars for public transit can change a person’s view of their city and reduce their stress.

Tauvra Trent, an East Oakland resident who currently cannot work due to disability issues and does not own a car, said the card would give her the freedom to take her children to school on buses AC Transit.

“The extra money eases the burden a bit,” she said.

Both of Trent’s children recently suffered from COVID-19, despite having been vaccinated. Her 16-year-old son is still having severe headaches and her 7-year-old son’s asthma has gotten worse. Trent reckons she typically spends at least $100 a month on public transportation, sometimes to get to the doctor, although recently this was achieved via video.

Mike Garcia, who lives in Oakland and works in San Francisco, said he barely earns enough to save money after paying rent and essentials like groceries. He spent at least $100 a month on BART to get to work and said knowing people in need are getting help makes him feel more connected to Oakland.

“It makes me happy to know that the city takes care of people. It’s just a matter of peace of mind,” he said.

Most of the people we spoke to were people of color, people with disabilities, and seniors. The majority were service workers who have seen the worst of the pandemic, including people who have fallen ill multiple times from COVID-19. Most used the cards for essential trips, such as going to work, buying groceries or seeing a doctor. And all found the extra money very useful during a time of high inflation and uncertainty.

On average, the $300 covers about a month’s transportation costs for the residents we spoke to. A round trip Oakland-San Francisco BART is usually about $10 and a one-way AC bus ride is $2.25. Participants in OakDOT’s mobility pilot can also receive means-based discounts available from local transit providers, such as Bike Share for All and Clipper START.

Reverend Sarah Gardner of the Allen Temple Baptist Church said the card gave her more autonomy. Gardner is disabled and lives on welfare and is already part of a program where her insurance pays for her transportation to and from her doctor’s office and pharmacies. But this schedule forces her to stick to a tight schedule that she sometimes can’t keep because of work.

“I take around 15 pills a day and have to go to the pharmacy to pick them up. And if you don’t get them back within a certain time, it comes back and you have to start the process all over again. I have to spend $20 to get my medicine,” she said.

Over a thousand people applied for the cards. Applicants who were not chosen for this initial phase were placed at the top of the list in case the city expanded the program, an outcome dependent on future grants.

Card distribution began in the last week of December 2021 with the majority of people experiencing no issues. However, at least 26 people contacted this reporter to say they hadn’t received the cards and had trouble getting a replacement from OakDOT. Oaklandside has provided OakDOT with the email addresses and phone numbers of people who have not received their cards — as requested by residents — so the city can follow up and help them.

Some supporters hope the program is the start of a future where public transit is free. AC Transit District Manager Jovanka Beckles has previously come up with such an idea.

Oakland isn’t the only Bay Area city piloting free or prepaid transit cards. Last year, Santa Rosa approved free public transit for students through their senior year of high school during the summer, and that’s already leading to increased ridership. San Francisco has a similar program for children. The Sonoma Climate Mobilization group tried to convince Sonoma County to fund a free rate system using PG&E fire settlement funds.

But Todd Litman, executive director of the Victoria Transport Policy Institute, a Canadian transit research think tank, said in an interview that studies like his have found that free transit programs don’t lead to same results as providing transit-specific subsidies, such as the Oakland initiative.

Free-for-all public transit often leads cyclists and walkers to take the bus more often and doesn’t convince drivers to ditch the cars, Litman said. “And so you get more crowded buses and trains with very little reduction in car travel. Transit service is actually getting worse.

According to Litman, low-income people who own and use a car choose to use it less if they receive transit subsidies. One explanation for this choice is that people with low incomes tend to live in disadvantaged neighborhoods in terms of infrastructure, which are more scattered and without essential services nearby. Subsidized public transit allows them to make a financial decision about these types of trips.

“If you make $10 an hour and have to travel 30 miles to get to work, you’d love it if you could use public transportation and avoid some of those trips,” Litman said. He added that Oakland’s choice to use a card that can be used at all transit agencies, as opposed to a discount for a system like BART, is good for two reasons: it gives people the flexibility to use the whole system and improves fairness.

Litman also claims that programs focused on financial need are better than mainstream discount programs that tend to benefit economically advantaged people. Most seniors who currently enjoy 50% off BART rides, for example, are on average better off economically than younger people. “The poverty rates by age are clear. The elderly have about half the poverty rate as families with children.

Jose Juarez is a social worker in Oakland who started using his free transit card this month. 1 credit

Joel Batterman, a community and regional planning expert who works for a coalition of US transit rider unions and led an advocacy group in Detroit, said the more people realize that access to public transit in base leads to better financial and health outcomes, the more people will come to view public transport as a personal right.

“One of our slogans was that transport is freedom. Everyone has the right to move. Pilots like Oakland are good for low-income people,” he said. But to really expand and free up more money for them, Batterman said, governments need to stop spending most of their transportation funds on things like highway expansions.

Another thing Oakland’s new card program shows is that public transit isn’t just about getting to work or school. Some Oakland residents with the card use it for fun and stress relief.

Jose Juarez is a social worker who helps homeless seniors at Lake Merritt Lodge access health services. Since the pandemic began, Juarez has had COVID three times, cared for his sick wife when she became critically ill, and helped rescue homeless residents who sometimes check into the lodge in poor health.

“You know, I’m very happy with the work I’m doing. I have the ability to give people hope. It’s fulfilling for my soul,” he said.

Juarez said he enjoys using his card to ride the many Veo-branded electric scooters available around Oakland. If he hadn’t gotten free money to pay for scooter rides, he said he wouldn’t have considered using them.

So, during a lunch break this week, the 60-something happily strolled around Lake Merritt.

]]>
Local schools raise over $75,000 and benefit Super Bowl Monday https://www.smlxtralarge.com/local-schools-raise-over-75000-and-benefit-super-bowl-monday/ Sat, 12 Feb 2022 03:00:35 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/local-schools-raise-over-75000-and-benefit-super-bowl-monday/ Super Bowl excitement is everywhere you turn this weekend in Cincinnati, including local schools where more than 20 superintendents canceled Monday classes to celebrate and school communities raised more than $75,000 for local charities. Some districts have set a fundraising goal so students can “earn” their day off, which has led to many generous donations […]]]>

Super Bowl excitement is everywhere you turn this weekend in Cincinnati, including local schools where more than 20 superintendents canceled Monday classes to celebrate and school communities raised more than $75,000 for local charities.

Some districts have set a fundraising goal so students can “earn” their day off, which has led to many generous donations flowing to Cincinnati-area nonprofits to help families in the need.

For subscribers: ‘Proud Son of Southeast Ohio’: What can Joe Burrow do for the region after the Super Bowl?

At the Southwest Local School District, facilities and communications director Mike Morris said the community has more than tripled its goal of $9,400 to the Sam Hubbard Foundation, which provides educational, medical and athletic resources to children and vulnerable families in Ohio.

“We love the hometown connections and the fact that support stays close to home,” Morris said in an email.

The final tally was $31,576, Morris said, with donations coming from the Southwestern school community and faraway places like Arizona and New York. Two local Harrison businesses — comprehensive orthodontic practice Boley Braces and Mexican restaurant El Mariachi — also made significant donations, Morris said.

Students accept donations for the Sam Hubbard Foundation from El Mariachi, a Mexican restaurant in Harrison.

Sycamore Schools students and staff raised $23,531 for Operation Give Back, a Blue Ash-based nonprofit that provides tutoring, food and support to children and parents in need and Sycamore Bridges, a community group that connects families in need with local advocates and donors, officials said.

The district’s original goal for families was $8,822. More than $18,000 was raised in less than a day, officials said.

]]>
American Portfolios extends AP for LIFE Creative Residency through 2024 to benefit Ferguson, Mo. Creatives https://www.smlxtralarge.com/american-portfolios-extends-ap-for-life-creative-residency-through-2024-to-benefit-ferguson-mo-creatives/ Mon, 31 Jan 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/american-portfolios-extends-ap-for-life-creative-residency-through-2024-to-benefit-ferguson-mo-creatives/ The private and independent broker/dealer renews its commitment to fostering creative entrepreneurship by providing financial support and promoting financial literacy. HOLBROOK, NY –News Direct– American Portfolios Financial Services, Inc. American Portfolios Financial Services, Inc. (AP) – a private, independent broker/dealer providing services and support to financial professionals across the United States – announces AP extension […]]]>

The private and independent broker/dealer renews its commitment to fostering creative entrepreneurship by providing financial support and promoting financial literacy.

HOLBROOK, NY –News Direct– American Portfolios Financial Services, Inc.

American Portfolios Financial Services, Inc. (AP) – a private, independent broker/dealer providing services and support to financial professionals across the United States – announces AP extension for LIFE Creative Residency, a socially responsible program that benefits Ferguson, Missouri-based creative entrepreneurs committed to the LIFE Creative STL ecosystem. After two successful years of sponsorship, AP is increasing its funding over a two-year period beginning January 1, 2022, through its nonprofit arm, The American Portfolios Foundation, Inc.

“They say if you save a life, you’ve saved the world,” says CEO and Chairman Lon T. Dolber. “Financial literacy is a key part of this process, which is why American Portfolios decided to plant a ‘social responsibility’ flag in Ferguson, Missouri, a community that continues to be extremely underserved and often described as ground zero for Social Justice. AP’s mission is to help its affiliated investment professionals help their clients realize their American dreams. Everyone’s dreams matter, and we hope AP for LIFE Creative Residency will turn countless dreams into reality.

“We are thrilled and feel extremely fortunate to be able to partner with American Portfolios again for the benefit of young creatives and our community,” says Brian Owens, Founder of LIFE Creative STL Ecosystem. “We look forward to this expansion and to providing even more support and opportunities for our creative residents.”

Recognized by the financial services industry in two separate awards programs (ThinkAdvisor LUMINAIRES 2021 and 2021 WealthMangagement.com Industry Awards), AP for LIFE benefits LIFE Arts, Inc., the nonprofit arm of the LIFE Creative STL ecosystem founded by renowned musician Brian Owens. The Ferguson-based organization provides local youth in the North County, St. Louis area with a platform where they can fully express and develop their creative voice. AP for LIFE grants five talented artists (“residents”) much-needed funding, mentorship and financial advice, providing them with the essential resources to serve as role models and leaders within their communities. Five of AP’s affiliated investment professionals serve as financial literacy mentors to each of the residents, helping them plan for their future by managing a small investment account and stipend made available through residency funding.

“AP for LIFE has the potential to become a nationally recognized workforce, finance and workforce development program – one that shapes the way society understands the” creative,” where “creatives” are seen as “creative entrepreneurs” and whose art demonstrates a purposeful life that naturally translates into social impact,” says Darius Williams, Executive Director of Life Arts.

AP for LIFE addresses several fundamental social challenges for young creatives, including lack of financial support and wealth generation, scarcity of workforce opportunities, and pathways for creative entrepreneurs to leverage their platforms to identify and successfully meet the needs of their community. The program offers solutions to these challenges by providing financial advice; a small investment account and monthly stipend for each resident; social and creative mentoring; access to platform development and marketing resources; and opportunities to impact youth in surrounding communities. “For the first time in my life, I was able to be a full-time artist thanks to the incredible financial advice I received,” says Malena Smith, resident singer, songwriter and influencer. Fellow resident Joshua “Paco” Lee, CEO and founder of Crush Records Collective, agrees. “Between allowance and advice, I’m learning how to generate wealth in a way that supports my life and career in a variety of ways.” Smith and Lee will remain residents for part of the two-year program renewal; upon graduation, two new creatives will become residents. To date, three residents (T. Moore, Mike Bland and Stephanie Holly) have graduated from the program.

The residence helps boost commerce in the area, creating a booming source of income with countless tributaries. Over the past two years, AP for LIFE funding and mentorship has been instrumental in the production of many multimedia projects, artistic works and educational resources, including the Homegrown Soul concert and film series; the musicals “A New Holiday” and “An Intimate Christmas”, which star Malena Smith; Smith’s forthcoming untitled EP; and “Midnight Rails” by AP for LIFE Creative Resident Cecil McClendon. Additionally, numerous brands, companies and platforms, including AP for LIFE alum and Founder Stephanie Holly of Little Beats’ “Compositions for LIFE” therapeutic songwriting program for middle and high school students; Little Beats edutainment video series for young children; and AP for LIFE alum Maria A. Ellis’ Girl Conductor Edutainment Series – are part of several social programs and projects within the LIFE creative ecosystem, directly impacting over 100 local youth and mentoring over 15 creatives. .

The nonprofit’s focus for 2022 and beyond will be the Campus for Life, Arts, and Culture (CLAC), which is intended to serve North St. Louis County, through educational, therapeutic and workforce development, as well as arts programs. in a centralized space with the aim of cultivating and empowering students, creatives, entrepreneurs and community actors.

About US Wallets

Based in Holbrook, New York, American Portfolios Financial Services, Inc. (APFS) is an independent, full-service broker/dealer and member firm of FINRA and SIPC, offering a full range of financial services, including planning personal finance and retirement, securities trading, mutual funds, access to investment research, long-term care planning, insurance products and duty-free investing tax. Fee-based asset management is offered through its sister subsidiary, American Portfolios Advisors, Inc., (APA), an SEC-registered investment adviser. Both entities, along with the technology entity American Portfolios Advisory Solutions, LLC, collectively reside under the legal entity American Portfolios Holdings, Inc. (APH). Full-service securities brokerage is available through a clearing house relationship with Pershing, LLC, a BNY Mellon company, whose securities are held on a fully disclosed basis. The firm supports independent investment professionals, including registered assistants and unregistered associates, nationwide.

American Portfolios has numerous recognitions from a number of industry publications and organizations. This recognition includes: Multiple Broker of the Year* (Division III) awards from Investment Advisor magazine; several ThinkAdvisor LUMINAIRES awards; multiple WealthManagement.com Industry Award finalists and awards in multiple categories**; Corporate Citizen of the Year by Long Island Business News; multiple rankings among the best companies to work for in New York State by the New York State Society for Human Resources Management (NYS-SHRM) and the Best Companies Group (BCG); and one of the best places to work on Long Island.

*Based on a survey of Registered Representatives conducted by Investment Advisor magazine. The best rated brokers/dealers by their representatives receive the “Broker/Dealer (B/D) of the Year” award.

** Wealthmanagement.com Industry Award finalists are selected by an independent judging panel of industry subject matter experts. Reward is based on support provided to AP Affiliates and does not reflect public customers or their account performance.

About American Portfolio Foundation, Inc.

American Portfolios Foundation, Inc. (APF), a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that was originally established in New York in 2004 and amended in 2018 and headquartered in Holbrook, New York, is designed as a non-profit organization designed to advance awareness, assistance and support for charitable causes. Board members include AP CEO Lon T. Dolber, chairman; AP Administrative Director Dalchand Laljit, Vice President; and AP Chief Financial Officer Damon Joyner, Treasurer/Secretary. In addition, various roles are held by PA headquarters staff. The Board meets quarterly to discuss its existing relationships with various charities and to determine the direction of various upcoming initiatives that will require the services and support of the Foundation.

About LIFE Arts, Inc.

LIFE Arts, Inc. is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that provides artistic resources, opportunities, mentorship, and positive experiences to help students develop the qualities and skills they need to live up to their God-given potential. The organization believes that through leadership skills and the discipline of the arts, the youth of St. Louis can be a driving force, shaping the change we all so desperately want to see happen.

AP for LIFE benefits LIFE Arts, Inc., the nonprofit arm of the LIFE Creative STL ecosystem founded by renowned musician Brian Owens (top row, middle).

Contact Details

U.S. Portfolios Financial Services, Inc.

Melissa Grappone

+1 631-439-4600

apcorpcomm@americanportfolios.com

Company Website

Front Page

See source version at newsdirect.com: https://newsdirect.com/news/american-portfolios-extends-ap-for-life-creative-residency-through-2024-to-benefit-ferguson-mo-creatives-679525865

]]>
UVic News – University of Victoria https://www.smlxtralarge.com/uvic-news-university-of-victoria/ Tue, 18 Jan 2022 00:39:13 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/uvic-news-university-of-victoria/ After spending hundreds, if not thousands, of hours on the high seas researching microscopic seaweed, Wylee Fitz-Gerald, former Schulich frontman and earth and ocean science graduate, has some advice for battling seasickness: “Get plenty of fresh air and keep your eyes on the horizon. It’s a prescription the University of Victoria graduate learned to follow, […]]]>

After spending hundreds, if not thousands, of hours on the high seas researching microscopic seaweed, Wylee Fitz-Gerald, former Schulich frontman and earth and ocean science graduate, has some advice for battling seasickness: “Get plenty of fresh air and keep your eyes on the horizon. It’s a prescription the University of Victoria graduate learned to follow, thanks in large part to the Schulich scholarship Leader she received in 2015.

Established in 2012 by businessman and philanthropist Seymour Schulich, the Schulich Leader Scholarships are awarded to high school graduates who enroll in an undergraduate science, technology, engineering or math (STEM) program at 20 partner universities in Canada, including the University of Victoria. To date, more than 500 students have received Schulich scholarships of $80,000 to pursue a science degree and $100,000 for an engineering degree. So far, there have been 20 Schulich Scholars at UVic, with My Huy Lim and Denaisha Kraft joining the community in 2021. Currently celebrating its first decade, the Schulich Leader Scholars Program is well on its way to achieving its goal. shameless to “create the next generation of technological innovators.

“Responsibility to give others opportunities”

For Fitz-Gerald, who is currently pursuing a Master of Science in Oceanography at the University of British Columbia, receiving the prestigious Schulich Scholarship has not only meant financial stability to help him achieve his academic goals, but instilled the importance of mentorship and generosity.

“With the Schulich Leader Scholarship, one thing I learned is that while all these opportunities are available to you, you also have a responsibility to provide opportunities for others. It’s like going up the ladder, turning around and reaching out to help the next person up.

Fitz-Gerald says what makes the Schulich Scholarship different from other scholarships is that it builds community.

“It pushed me to go further because there was so much expectation of me and because people put you in this box where they lift you up, and you want to fit in there,” Fitz-Gerald says. “So I ended up mentoring the new Schulich Leaders coming in…and that really allowed me to make a difference and get involved with the university.”

Community of researchers

Fascinated by technology and computers from a young age, Robert Lee, a graduate of the University of Victoria, says receiving a Schulich Leader Scholarship in Engineering in 2016 allowed him to devote his time to his passions in STEM without worrying about financial pressures.

“When I first learned that I had won the Schulich I was over the moon. It was a whirlwind of so many feelings. There is not only a sense of accomplishment and recognition for my work hard work and dedication, but also a reaffirmation that my journey in life was on the right track,” says Lee. “It also reminded me that I should continue to pursue my interests, such as giving back to the community and continuing to strive for a thorough understanding of my classes.”

In May, Lee graduated with a bachelor’s degree in computer engineering with a major in computer intelligence and has worked full-time for Microsoft for six months as a software engineer. He has worked remotely from Victoria since his early days at Microsoft, but plans to relocate to the company’s offices in Redmond, WA, USA in the coming months.

Although his time at UVic is behind him, Lee says what he learned during this time in his life and the impact of the Schulich Fellowship continue to guide him.

“The Schulich Fellowship has connected me to an incredibly inspiring community of scholars for 10 years now,” says Lee. “Having this community and support network, not only when you have questions – former students who are a few years ahead may have understood the challenges you are currently trying to overcome – but also to share my advice and my experience with future Schulich Scholars, this is a really important and unique aspect of the Schulich Leader Scholars program.

Visit schulichleaders10.com for more Schulich Leaders spotlight.

If you are a company looking to hire Canada’s top STEM talent, contact the Schulich Program through this form.

]]>
TWU partners with NCTC to expand access for rural students https://www.smlxtralarge.com/twu-partners-with-nctc-to-expand-access-for-rural-students/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 18:09:26 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/twu-partners-with-nctc-to-expand-access-for-rural-students/ January 14, 2022 – DENTON – Texas Woman’s University has partnered with North Central Texas College (NCTC) to launch the Red River Promise program, which offers high school students in 13 school districts the opportunity to attend college for free and benefit from a range of support services. Eligible students who commit to the program […]]]>

January 14, 2022 – DENTON – Texas Woman’s University has partnered with North Central Texas College (NCTC) to launch the Red River Promise program, which offers high school students in 13 school districts the opportunity to attend college for free and benefit from a range of support services.

Eligible students who commit to the program can attend NCTC, Texas Woman’s, or several other partner institutions in the fall after graduating from high school. The Promise program covers tuition and fees not covered by federal and state financial aid or institutional scholarships.

The partnership aims to create a stronger college culture among rural high school graduates and provide a more affordable path to higher education that won’t lead to high debt loads, said NCTC Chancellor Brent Wallace.

School districts participating in the program are Bowie ISD, Callisburg ISD, Era ISD, Forestburg ISD, Gainesville ISD, Gold-Burg ISD, Graham ISD, Lindsay ISD, Muenster ISD, Nocona ISD, Prairie Valley ISD, Saint Jo ISD and Valley View DSI . High school students in schools in these districts can contact their counselor for more information or visit promise.nctc.edu.

The Red River Promise program is funded by a grant from the Greater Texas Foundation, with additional support from the Rural Community College Alliance, the National College Promise Campaign, and Phi Theta Kappa.

The launch of the Red River Promise program came about a month after Texas Woman’s partnered with Grayson College to establish the Texoma Promise, a similar initiative that benefits rural students in this area of ​​North Texas.

Page last updated on January 14, 2022 at 10:09 a.m.


]]>
M’town boys win tournament titles, tickets win big – Lake County Record-Bee https://www.smlxtralarge.com/mtown-boys-win-tournament-titles-tickets-win-big-lake-county-record-bee/ Sat, 04 Dec 2021 07:08:59 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/mtown-boys-win-tournament-titles-tickets-win-big-lake-county-record-bee/ ARBUCKLE – Despite leading the Middletown High School college basketball team to the finals of the Pierce tournament, head coach GJ Rockwell never left the championship cup … until Friday night. Led by 14 points from tournament MVP Cole Ketchum and 11 points each from Lucas DaCosta and all-tournament selection Brody Breeden, the Mustangs overcame […]]]>

ARBUCKLE – Despite leading the Middletown High School college basketball team to the finals of the Pierce tournament, head coach GJ Rockwell never left the championship cup … until Friday night.

Led by 14 points from tournament MVP Cole Ketchum and 11 points each from Lucas DaCosta and all-tournament selection Brody Breeden, the Mustangs overcame a tough night with the ball to beat Dixon 52-41 in the tournament championship game at Arbuckle.

“I’ve been in the final two or three times but never won,” said Rockwell. “It’s exciting, especially for the seniors.”

Middletown (3-0) were 14-3 back in the first quarter and Rockwell said the problem was easy to diagnose.

“If we jump off the Brooklyn Bridge, we couldn’t fall into the water,” he said of the team’s missed chances. “I think we missed 10 layups in the first quarter.”

Middletown fought their way back to only 15-11 by the end of the period. While the Mustangs didn’t exactly fire from the field for the last three quarters, they hit enough shots the rest of the way and let their defenses take over from there.

“Our defense started after that first quarter and we just worked it out and played the games when we needed them,” said Rockwell.

Middletown led at halftime by 23:19 and went into fourth quarter with 39:29. The Mustangs were still up 10 with less than three minutes ahead when Dixon hit consecutive 3-pointers and got within three points.

“We did a layup to make five, then we got the ball back and Luke hit a big 3 to put it away,” said Rockwell of senior guard Luke Hoogendoorn who played Ketchum and Breeden in the all-tournament Team joined.

“He did all the little things for us that you have to do to win a game like this,” said Rockwell of Hoogendoorn. “He played really well.”

Like Zach Dubois, Hoogendorn scored seven points.

“Tell you what, this is a growing game for these guys,” said Rockwell. “They could have given up in several places, but they didn’t. I’m really proud of the way they struggled. They are fighters. ”

Middletown welcomes Lower Lake in the North Central League I opener for both teams on Tuesday evening.

In other boys’ tournaments on Friday:

Clear Lake 63, Vacaville Christian 34

At Lakeport, pushed to the position of point guard because of an injury to Jake Soderquist, Clear Lake senior Ethan Maize seems to be adjusting quite well in his first two games for the Cardinals. On Friday he led the team with 22 points, including four 3-point points, in a first-round win over Vacaville Christian in the Round-Robin Larrea Memorial Tournament.

“Ethan was amazing,” said Clear Lake head coach Mike Damiata. “He shot out the light tonight.”

Clear Lake (2-0) will play two games on Saturday as the tournament ends – 1:30 p.m. against Fort Bragg and 7:45 p.m. against Lower Lake.

“We had a really good first half, played a good defense, messed everything up,” said Damiata. “We were focused tonight and played with a lot of confidence.”

Clear Lake led 17-5 after the quarter and 35-17 at halftime. The Cardinals were able to easily negotiate a third quarter in which they only met in the last two minutes of the quarter. Even so, Vacaville Christian was only able to reduce the Cardinals’ lead by two points before the fourth quarter.

“We didn’t turn the ball and give them easy points,” said Damiata.

Clear Lake only committed five ball losses and only one in the second half.

Drake Smart, a post player. added 10 points while Joey Soderquist, Jack Daskam and Greyson Wind added six each.

“Daskam was a beast,” he said of the senior’s 11 rebounds.

Wind also came off the bench to hit a pair of 3-pointers.

Maize has 41 points in his first two games.

“We improve every time,” said Damiata. “The boys are excited.”

Previously, Vacaville had defeated Christian in junior varsity action Clear Lake 52-42. Dayne Wilson led the Cardinals with 15 points and Raul Reyes added 13.

Clear Lake had a 10-point lead at halftime before running into foul problems in the third quarter. Vacaville Christian took control of the game with a run at the start of the final period.

Saint Bernard 72, Kelseyville 57

In Upper Lake, which had declined by up to 24 points in the second half, the Kelseyville Knights closed with three minutes from time to eight minutes before St. Bernard before they beat the Crusaders in a second round game at the Round Robin Cougars Small Schools fell classic.

Kelseyville is 0-2 in tournament play and 0-3 in the season. The Knights play Willits on Saturday at 3 p.m., also 0-2 in the tournament game.

“They’re a really good team,” said Kelseyville head coach Oscar Lopez of the Crusaders, who averaged six feet on their starting grid, including 6-foot-7 junior center Owen Shanahan. “They injured us in the first half with a lot of putbacks in the offensive lens.”

Saint Bernard (3-0) can also shoot the 3-pointer. The Crusaders beat in nine Treys, but Kelseyville made them a better one with a straight 10, five from Luke Watkins (22 points) and four more from Jake Keithly (18 points).

“We hung out with them pretty well,” said Lopez. “We molested her all night. I don’t think they ever felt comfortable. ”

Keithly wore the Knights in the first half when he scored 12 of his 18, then Watkins took over in the second half when he scored 17 of his 22. Watkins also double-doubled after pulling 11 rebounds.

Lopez said he also received solid play from one of the smallest players on the floor, Adolpho Arias. He finished with eight points.

“Adolpho played a great game,” said Lopez. “He fought against their greats.”

After Kelseyville had reduced St. Bernard’s lead to eight points in the final minutes, the Crusaders dropped the game.

“You hit a couple of daggers,” said Lopez.

St. Bernard defeated Willits 75-41 in the first round on Thursday.

Willits 44, Oberer See 40

In Upper Lake, the Upper Lake Cougars went into fourth quarter 36:32, but the Willits Wolverines rallied for victory in the second round of the Cougars Small Schools Classic.

Both teams are 1: 1 in the round robin competition. The cougars are 1-2 in the season.

“It’s definitely up to me,” said Upper Lake head coach Miles Hayes of his team’s game. “I didn’t make the adjustments. It’s up to me, not them. ”

Sammy Avalos scored 12 points for the Cougars, Darian Loans Arrow added nine more, all on 3-pointers, and Kai Young had eight points.

Hayes said Blaine Rhodes’ solid play on defense was a ray of hope for the Cougars.

“Sammy is the heart of this team, but Blaine is one of those glue. He doesn’t get all of the awards that other guys like Sammy and Kai get, but he allows them to do what they do. ”

Upper Lake closes the tournament game on Saturday against St. Bernard’s of Eureka, which after beating Kelseyville on Friday 2-0 in tournament action.

Fort Bragg 62, Lower Lake 47

At Lakeport, the Fort Bragg Timberwolves defeated Lower Lake in the first round of the Larrea Memorial Tournament Round-Robin, leaving the Trojans 0-2 that season.

The score and other game details were not reported to the record bee.

Fort Bragg also beat Lower Lake in JV bracket 59-38 of the tournament.

]]>