executive director – SMLXtlarge http://www.smlxtralarge.com/ Tue, 01 Mar 2022 10:00:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-5-150x150.png executive director – SMLXtlarge http://www.smlxtralarge.com/ 32 32 As infrastructure money flows, Mitch Landrieu must straddle the partisan divide https://www.smlxtralarge.com/as-infrastructure-money-flows-mitch-landrieu-must-straddle-the-partisan-divide/ Tue, 01 Mar 2022 10:00:19 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/as-infrastructure-money-flows-mitch-landrieu-must-straddle-the-partisan-divide/ WASHINGTON — In a rare official press conference in January, President Biden hailed the $1 trillion infrastructure package that Democrats and Republicans recently endorsed, promising that miles of roads would be rebuilt, railroads and bridges would be modernized and America’s public transit system would become a source of international envy. On the same day, 16 […]]]>

WASHINGTON — In a rare official press conference in January, President Biden hailed the $1 trillion infrastructure package that Democrats and Republicans recently endorsed, promising that miles of roads would be rebuilt, railroads and bridges would be modernized and America’s public transit system would become a source of international envy.

On the same day, 16 Republican governors sent a letter to Mr. Biden who highlighted the daunting challenge he faces in turning his ambitions for the law into reality.

Governors rebuffed federal attempts, described in a note, to encourage states to use the funds to fix roads instead of expanding them, which the Biden administration says would exacerbate auto emissions. The letter urged the administration to refrain from using the law to advance its ‘social agenda’, which they said would hinder their own goals for the package, and to give them ‘maximum regulatory flexibility’ in spending funds.

Mr Biden is expected to promote the law and pledge to fix 65,000 miles of roads and 1,500 bridges during his State of the Union address on Tuesday. He has spent the past few weeks traveling across the country to sell the package, which is at the heart of his broader agenda to cut emissions, promote racial equity, create jobs and help households. disadvantaged. But much of its success rests with heads of state, who decide how to use much of the funds and who don’t always share the president’s goals.

At the center of this tension is Mitch Landrieu, the former mayor of New Orleans who helped rebuild the city after Hurricane Katrina. As Mr. Biden’s infrastructure czar, Mr. Landrieu is tasked with ensuring that a flagship part of the president’s agenda is carried out on his terms.

He has engaged in an advocacy campaign with state and local leaders in an effort to realize Mr. Biden’s vision, speaking with nearly every governor and more than 55 mayors and traveling the country to promote the law. On February 16, Mr. Landrieu met with a bipartisan group of senators to discuss their fundraising goals.

Some state leaders have said their priorities align well with those of the federal government, such as repairing existing roads, repairing decades-old bridges and expanding Amtrak service.

“Broadly speaking, the goals of the bill and our goals are the same,” said Gov. Ned Lamont of Connecticut, a Democrat. “It’s about modernizing old infrastructure that is essential for economic development. It is a question of justice and fairness. »

But others, while accepting the money, have bristled at federal attempts to guide how it is spent.

Gov. Pete Ricketts of Nebraska, who signed the Jan. 19 letter, said states, especially those off the East Coast, need the space to pursue their own priorities, such as building new highways. He also said expanding Amtrak service, a key goal of the Biden administration, was “not very helpful” in Nebraska given its less dense population.

Mr. Landrieu called Mr. Ricketts in November to discuss how the two parties could coordinate their efforts. While the governor said he appreciated the call, he isn’t optimistic the Biden administration will give states the flexibility they need.

“Awareness doesn’t matter if you want to restrict us,” Ricketts said.

Republican lawmakers, several of whom voted with Democrats to pass the law, sided with the states. Senators Mitch McConnell of Kentucky and Shelley Moore Capito of West Virginia wrote his own letter to governors telling them to ignore the administration’s memo, which they said had “no effect of law.” On February 18, Mr. McConnell, Ms. Capito and 27 other Republican senators sent a letter to Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg criticizing the memo.

Mr Landrieu, in an interview with The New York Times, said the governors’ letter did not surprise him. “There will always be conflict in this area,” he said of the tension between the federal government and the states.

Resolving this conflict will be a delicate balancing act. He acknowledged that governors “would have the ultimate decision” and that some communities, such as those with fewer roads and bridges to repair, would need more flexibility.

“In these cases, it makes perfect sense for them to do so. In other states, this is not the case. said M. Landrieu. “There has to be flexibility in that, and we recognize that.”

But he said the Biden administration would continue to try to influence the types of projects the funds went to, including issuing federal guidance and recommendations.

“The federal government has the power to establish what it calls guidelines, rules and regulations,” Landrieu said.

So far, some states have shown a willingness to defy — and challenge — these rules.

Governor Doug Ducey of Arizona, a Republican whose state recently sued the Biden administration over its efforts to claw back stimulus funds, said his office isn’t afraid to push back if he thinks the Federal directives were too exaggerated. Ducey said expanding highways is one of his top priorities for the rapidly growing state.

“We don’t need any further direction from the federal government,” he said.

Most of the money has yet to flow, with barely nearly $100 billion allocated to state and local governments and most of the funding expected to be released over the next two to three years.

This represents another challenge for Mr. Landrieu. It could be years before many of these projects are completed, making it harder for Mr Biden to highlight the law’s impact during the midterm elections and ahead of his re-election campaign. .

Mr. Landrieu said he faced a similar dilemma while in office, pointing to the construction of the new terminal at Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport. This billion-dollar project, which he pushed for and obtained funding for, was completed after his term, although he was not reelected. Mr. Landrieu said that Mr. Biden would continue to promote the package, but that he did not think the president should stand next to completed projects for Americans to understand his contribution.

“Getting credit really isn’t that important. I mean, what you’re doing here is something that’s going to last for generations, we hope,” Landrieu said. “So we want to move fast, but we want to do it right.”

“I can’t offer the African-American community anything about their experience,” Landrieu said. “I can offer my vision of being a white man from the South who grew up during one of the toughest racial times and how white people here are struggling to deal with race in a way that we allows us to recognize our past.”

His allies described him as an effective, detail-oriented leader who knew how to navigate the federal bureaucracy. He earned a reputation as someone who transformed New Orleans after it was ruled by C. Ray Nagin, who was later imprisoned for corruption and fraud. But it has faced a mixed record for some of its infrastructure work, including its management of the city’s sewer and water service. He was also known as an aggressive leader who pushed through his decisions, a style that antagonized some of his critics.

Some said Mr. Landrieu’s experience in charge of New Orleans had equipped him for his current job. The city, with its pothole-filled streets, century-old drains and persistent flooding problems, epitomizes some of the country’s most serious infrastructure shortcomings.

.

Cedric Richmond, one of Mr Biden’s closest advisers and a former congressman who represented most of New Orleans for a decade, said Mr Landrieu was used to making tough decisions to “get things done”, pointing to the new airport terminal.

Paul Rainwater, who served as acting executive director of the Sewerage and Water Board, said Mr Landrieu “won’t just accept an answer”.

“He wants to know the how and the why,” Mr. Rainwater said.

Mr Rainwater was tasked with straightening out the Sewerage and Water Board after a severe storm overwhelmed the city’s pump and drainage system, flooding hundreds of cars and properties. After the 2017 floods, Mr. Landrieu asked for resignation from some agency officials, who initially claimed that the system was working properly.

The situation has drawn criticism from the likes of Aaron Mischler, president of the New Orleans Fire Fighters Association, who said Landrieu had failed to improve the agency and oversee its leadership during his tenure. eight years in office.

“These issues remain,” he said.

Some of those who worked with Mr. Landrieu described him as an aggressive leader. Rosalind Cook, co-chair of the League of Women Voters of New Orleans, said the group met with Landrieu during his second term as mayor to discuss moving the upcoming election from early winter to fall, when voters would be less distracted. by holidays and sporting events.

According to Ms Cook, Mr Landrieu adamantly opposed the proposal, which could have shortened his term, and said change would have to wait.

“If he had a contradictory view, he was much more of a bully behind closed doors,” said Ms Cook, a professor of political science at Tulane University. The change was made later, but the inauguration date did not change, resulting in a longer transition.

Others said that Mr. Landrieu’s strong personality was an asset.

“Sometimes people aren’t always thrilled that a leader acts as decisively as Mitch must have done over time,” said Walt Leger, a former Louisiana state representative. “But I’ve never seen this negative result for the community.”

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Jewish and Japanese American groups among growing multiracial efforts calling for reparations for black Americans https://www.smlxtralarge.com/jewish-and-japanese-american-groups-among-growing-multiracial-efforts-calling-for-reparations-for-black-americans/ Sat, 26 Feb 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/jewish-and-japanese-american-groups-among-growing-multiracial-efforts-calling-for-reparations-for-black-americans/ Black leaders of the civil rights movement were among the biggest supporters of the effort, she says. Masaoka said the winning reparations gave the Japanese-American community strength, a chance to stand up and a sense of responsibility. Now she wants the black community to have the same. “I think we’ve always felt very connected to […]]]>

Black leaders of the civil rights movement were among the biggest supporters of the effort, she says. Masaoka said the winning reparations gave the Japanese-American community strength, a chance to stand up and a sense of responsibility. Now she wants the black community to have the same.

“I think we’ve always felt very connected to other communities of color and have seen similarities in our own situations,” Masaoka, Nikkei’s co-chair for civil rights and redress, told CNN. “We can fight for this and if we unite and build solidarity we can change this country and we can all heal,” she said.

Restorative efforts are also seen in states, cities, municipalities, and historic institutions, as they have begun to explore new ways to address past transgressions.

Last week, a student organization at the University of Chicago called on its university to pay more than $1 billion in repairs to the city’s South Side over the next 20 years. UChicago Against Displacement said in an op-ed that their university has been an “active participant in segregation and redlining” and that the money will provide “real, long-term affordable housing.”
Earlier this month, a Boston city councilman proposed a new commission to study reparations and other forms of compensation for the city’s role in slavery and inequality. Over two years, the commission would investigate the disparities and “historic damage” suffered by black Bostonians, drawing on historical documents, archival research and reaching out to the community.
Last year, California became the first state to establish a reparations task force to study the state’s role in perpetuating the legacy of slavery and to offer recommendations. Under AB3121, the task force is expected to recommend legislation this year.

These ongoing conversations at various levels have been led by black people supporting the quest for reparations, but other communities are now joining in their support.

These diverse groups are among more than 350 organizations that support HR 40. The commission would also examine how the United States would issue a formal apology for “the commission of gross human rights violations and crimes against humanity on the African slaves and their descendants”.

Rep. Lee, who reintroduced HR 40 last year, told CNN that the fact that other communities have received reparations at the federal level shows Congress can do the same for black people.

Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, D-Texas, right, speaks during a 2019 hearing on reparations for descendants of enslaved Americans.
HR 40 was first introduced to Congress by Michigan Democrat John Conyers in 1989. Former Rep. Conyers, who served until 2017, had consistently lobbied for reparations legislation on several occasions over the course of several sessions of Congress. After he left, Representative Lee became the bill’s chief advocate.

Early last year, the bill was introduced by the House Judiciary Committee in a 25-17 vote and now faces a full House vote. Rep. Lee is hopeful and says more than 200 of her colleagues are ready to vote to pass the bill. But she is also aware that the bill is being defeated in the Senate vote and urges her colleagues to understand that enslaved black people created the economic engine from which the nation was built.

Support for reparations from people outside the black community is a sign that the American Jewish and Japanese communities are on the side of justice, says Kamm Howard.

Howard, who is the national male co-chair of the National Black Coalition for Reparations in America, says that if the federal government is trying to address the harm inflicted on other communities, it’s only fair that lawmakers find a way to grant reparations to black Americans.

“There has been no attempt by the US government to specifically address the harm and the continuing harm being done to us,” Howard told CNN.

A Jewish Moral Appeal

Some members of the American Jewish community have long won support for the reparations. In 2019, the Union for Reform Judaism passed a pro-reparations resolution calling for a federal commission to “study and develop reparations proposals to address the historic and ongoing effects of slavery” and “systemic” racism against black Americans.

Yolanda Savage-Narva is the Director of Racial Equity, Diversity and Inclusion at the Religious Action Center for Reform Judaism, the part of the Union for Reform Judaism that focuses on advocacy and advocacy work. social justice.

“Our organization really understood that the call to study reparations was a Jewish moral call,” she told CNN. “It is imperative to ensure that every part of our humanity is seen as fair human beings and the call for reparations was a gesture for Reform Jewry to really put a stake in the ground.”

Holocaust victims within the Jewish community have received reparations and continue to receive annual pensions from the German and French governments.

Savage-Narva said she thinks it adds support and shows the United States that acknowledging and paying reparations is an important step in the healing process.

“The German government has really done what it has to do in terms of truth and reconciliation, and is committed, as far as possible, to making an effort to undo the harm that has been done,” he said. she declared. “Because the Jewish community has had their own historical trauma, they can make that connection and understand how important the process of reparation is.”

Why Japanese Americans Received Reparations

The Japanese-American community was one of the first communities to receive reparations from the US government and has supported the reparations movement for decades.

Japanese Americans who were interned in concentration camps in the United States during World War II from around 1942 to 1946 received reparations under the Civil Liberties Act of 1988. More than four decades later their imprisonment, the law awarded each surviving former internee $20,000.

Traci Kato-Kiriyama is the lead organizer of the Joint Reparations Committee of the Nikkei Progressives, a multigenerational community group that advocates for immigrant rights and issues for Japanese Americans, Muslims, and Little Tokyo.

“One of the reasons we understand the importance of reparations is to look at remedies and reparations for Japanese Americans,” Kato-Kiriyama told CNN. “It took the support of all kinds of people to come together, and we couldn’t have done it alone.”

David Inoue, executive director of the Japanese American Citizens League, said supporting the movement to pass HR 40 is the right thing to do and will lead to a better understanding and response to “current injustices rooted in the system”.

Inoue told CNN he thinks Congress is in a much different situation since Japanese Americans received reparations.

“The more of us who talk, the harder it will be to ignore us and our country’s responsibility to address and respond to this historic injustice,” Inoue said.

“We need federal reparations”

The idea of ​​reparations has been an ongoing debate since the end of the Civil War in 1865, when freed slaves were promised 40 acres and a mule. The founding meeting of the National Coalition of Black for Reparations in America in 1987 came together with the goal of broadening the base of support for the long-standing reparations movement.
Bill HR 40 was then introduced in 1989. Writer Ta-Nehisi Coates renewed the conversation about reparations in his 2014 article in The Atlantic, “The Case for Reparations”. Since its reintroduction into mainstream media, efforts have been made at the community, state, and national levels to compensate black people for slavery and systemic racism issues.
Author Ta-Nehisi Coates waits to testify about reparations for descendants of enslaved Americans at a hearing in 2019.

“All of these efforts, no matter where they take place, are important and good to keep moving forward,” Kato-Kiriyama told CNN. “It also reminds us that we don’t have to wait for a huge federal bill, although we do need federal reparations.”

At the national level, the movement for reparations is expected to take time.

Experts say that if the bill makes it through the House, it faces opposition from some Democrats and most Republicans – and is unlikely to have enough votes for a majority in the test. filibuster in the Senate.

Dr. Ron Daniels, head of the National African American Reparations Commission, told CNN he finds remarkable how far the idea of ​​reparations has come since it was introduced as an education bill in 1989.

“We’re knocking on the door for HR 40 to be enacted either by statute or more likely by executive order,” he said. “This is a major moment in American history.”

There are five major wounds of slavery that still plague the black community today, including people status and nation status; education; health; penalty sanction; and wealth and poverty, according to the NCOBRA.

Howard said the bill would look at those ongoing injuries, among other things, to define the degree of harm the black community has suffered and continues to suffer.

“There is today a rise in racism against African Americans and the pressure must be: why have Americans not been able to find a way to ease racial tensions? Rep. Lee told CNN. “Every time we move on, something brings us back to issues of race. This bill provides an opportunity to bring people together through understanding.”

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A proposed bank in Iowa wants to support small businesses https://www.smlxtralarge.com/a-proposed-bank-in-iowa-wants-to-support-small-businesses/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 22:31:33 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/a-proposed-bank-in-iowa-wants-to-support-small-businesses/ This is part three of a five-part story published in partnership with the Center for Public Integrity and Word In Black. WATERLOO, Iowa – The words were direct: “No American metropolitan area has greater social and economic disparities along racial lines. This is how the financial news site 24/7 Wall St. described this region in […]]]>

This is part three of a five-part story published in partnership with the Center for Public Integrity and Word In Black.

WATERLOO, Iowa – The words were direct: “No American metropolitan area has greater social and economic disparities along racial lines.

This is how the financial news site 24/7 Wall St. described this region in a 2018 article ranking it as the worst place in the country for black Americans.

It struck like thunder in the black community. Residents already knew there were problems – a report the year before called the region “still severely segregated”, and there was huge income gaps and home ownership between whites and blacks. But now they had the empirical ranking which showed that Waterloo’s problems did not simply reflect those of the country.

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Oakland is testing what happens when you give people $300 to ride the bus https://www.smlxtralarge.com/oakland-is-testing-what-happens-when-you-give-people-300-to-ride-the-bus%ef%bf%bc/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 00:01:22 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/oakland-is-testing-what-happens-when-you-give-people-300-to-ride-the-bus%ef%bf%bc/ Evonne Liang, a single mother who lives near Laney College, usually drives her car to work in downtown Oakland. She pays at least $14 to park, and constantly rising gas prices have forced her to look for deals wherever she can find them. His family budget is tight. “Any amount we can save helps. We […]]]>


Evonne Liang, a single mother who lives near Laney College, usually drives her car to work in downtown Oakland. She pays at least $14 to park, and constantly rising gas prices have forced her to look for deals wherever she can find them. His family budget is tight.

“Any amount we can save helps. We go to a nearby church that distributes food and clothing,” she said.

But a new free prepaid transit card has changed Liang’s mind about her commute. She now plans to take the bus to save money.

Called Universal Basic Mobility, the city’s Department of Transportation, or OakDOT, launched the free transit card program during the last week of December. OakDOT chose 500 people based on their income level and transportation needs. The $300 transit card is given out in two installments of $150 and can be used to pay for rides on AC Transit, BART, city bikes and scooters. The money for the Universal Basic Mobility program came from a $243,000 grant from the Alameda County Transportation Commission.

Over the next few months, OakDOT will collate survey responses from participants and use anonymous GPS data from their maps to plan for possible future expansions. Among the types of information the ministry is looking for is whether people change their travel behavior after receiving the grant and examining public transport habits to make better decisions about services. The map provider, Akimbo, says on its website that riders’ private location data is encrypted in such a way that it is unlikely to be hacked.

More than a dozen cardholders told The Oaklandside that the program has helped them get around and that even a few hundred extra dollars for public transit can change a person’s view of their city and reduce their stress.

Tauvra Trent, an East Oakland resident who currently cannot work due to disability issues and does not own a car, said the card would give her the freedom to take her children to school on buses AC Transit.

“The extra money eases the burden a bit,” she said.

Both of Trent’s children recently suffered from COVID-19, despite having been vaccinated. Her 16-year-old son is still having severe headaches and her 7-year-old son’s asthma has gotten worse. Trent reckons she typically spends at least $100 a month on public transportation, sometimes to get to the doctor, although recently this was achieved via video.

Mike Garcia, who lives in Oakland and works in San Francisco, said he barely earns enough to save money after paying rent and essentials like groceries. He spent at least $100 a month on BART to get to work and said knowing people in need are getting help makes him feel more connected to Oakland.

“It makes me happy to know that the city takes care of people. It’s just a matter of peace of mind,” he said.

Most of the people we spoke to were people of color, people with disabilities, and seniors. The majority were service workers who have seen the worst of the pandemic, including people who have fallen ill multiple times from COVID-19. Most used the cards for essential trips, such as going to work, buying groceries or seeing a doctor. And all found the extra money very useful during a time of high inflation and uncertainty.

On average, the $300 covers about a month’s transportation costs for the residents we spoke to. A round trip Oakland-San Francisco BART is usually about $10 and a one-way AC bus ride is $2.25. Participants in OakDOT’s mobility pilot can also receive means-based discounts available from local transit providers, such as Bike Share for All and Clipper START.

Reverend Sarah Gardner of the Allen Temple Baptist Church said the card gave her more autonomy. Gardner is disabled and lives on welfare and is already part of a program where her insurance pays for her transportation to and from her doctor’s office and pharmacies. But this schedule forces her to stick to a tight schedule that she sometimes can’t keep because of work.

“I take around 15 pills a day and have to go to the pharmacy to pick them up. And if you don’t get them back within a certain time, it comes back and you have to start the process all over again. I have to spend $20 to get my medicine,” she said.

Over a thousand people applied for the cards. Applicants who were not chosen for this initial phase were placed at the top of the list in case the city expanded the program, an outcome dependent on future grants.

Card distribution began in the last week of December 2021 with the majority of people experiencing no issues. However, at least 26 people contacted this reporter to say they hadn’t received the cards and had trouble getting a replacement from OakDOT. Oaklandside has provided OakDOT with the email addresses and phone numbers of people who have not received their cards — as requested by residents — so the city can follow up and help them.

Some supporters hope the program is the start of a future where public transit is free. AC Transit District Manager Jovanka Beckles has previously come up with such an idea.

Oakland isn’t the only Bay Area city piloting free or prepaid transit cards. Last year, Santa Rosa approved free public transit for students through their senior year of high school during the summer, and that’s already leading to increased ridership. San Francisco has a similar program for children. The Sonoma Climate Mobilization group tried to convince Sonoma County to fund a free rate system using PG&E fire settlement funds.

But Todd Litman, executive director of the Victoria Transport Policy Institute, a Canadian transit research think tank, said in an interview that studies like his have found that free transit programs don’t lead to same results as providing transit-specific subsidies, such as the Oakland initiative.

Free-for-all public transit often leads cyclists and walkers to take the bus more often and doesn’t convince drivers to ditch the cars, Litman said. “And so you get more crowded buses and trains with very little reduction in car travel. Transit service is actually getting worse.

According to Litman, low-income people who own and use a car choose to use it less if they receive transit subsidies. One explanation for this choice is that people with low incomes tend to live in disadvantaged neighborhoods in terms of infrastructure, which are more scattered and without essential services nearby. Subsidized public transit allows them to make a financial decision about these types of trips.

“If you make $10 an hour and have to travel 30 miles to get to work, you’d love it if you could use public transportation and avoid some of those trips,” Litman said. He added that Oakland’s choice to use a card that can be used at all transit agencies, as opposed to a discount for a system like BART, is good for two reasons: it gives people the flexibility to use the whole system and improves fairness.

Litman also claims that programs focused on financial need are better than mainstream discount programs that tend to benefit economically advantaged people. Most seniors who currently enjoy 50% off BART rides, for example, are on average better off economically than younger people. “The poverty rates by age are clear. The elderly have about half the poverty rate as families with children.

Jose Juarez is a social worker in Oakland who started using his free transit card this month. 1 credit

Joel Batterman, a community and regional planning expert who works for a coalition of US transit rider unions and led an advocacy group in Detroit, said the more people realize that access to public transit in base leads to better financial and health outcomes, the more people will come to view public transport as a personal right.

“One of our slogans was that transport is freedom. Everyone has the right to move. Pilots like Oakland are good for low-income people,” he said. But to really expand and free up more money for them, Batterman said, governments need to stop spending most of their transportation funds on things like highway expansions.

Another thing Oakland’s new card program shows is that public transit isn’t just about getting to work or school. Some Oakland residents with the card use it for fun and stress relief.

Jose Juarez is a social worker who helps homeless seniors at Lake Merritt Lodge access health services. Since the pandemic began, Juarez has had COVID three times, cared for his sick wife when she became critically ill, and helped rescue homeless residents who sometimes check into the lodge in poor health.

“You know, I’m very happy with the work I’m doing. I have the ability to give people hope. It’s fulfilling for my soul,” he said.

Juarez said he enjoys using his card to ride the many Veo-branded electric scooters available around Oakland. If he hadn’t gotten free money to pay for scooter rides, he said he wouldn’t have considered using them.

So, during a lunch break this week, the 60-something happily strolled around Lake Merritt.

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REC: Commits financial support of ₹7.50 Cr to Mizoram State Sports Council (MSSC) for the construction of Motor Racing Track and Sports Complex in Lengpui, Mamit District of Mizoram https://www.smlxtralarge.com/rec-commits-financial-support-of-%e2%82%b97-50-cr-to-mizoram-state-sports-council-mssc-for-the-construction-of-motor-racing-track-and-sports-complex-in-lengpui-mamit-district-of-mizoram/ Fri, 18 Feb 2022 05:31:07 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/rec-commits-financial-support-of-%e2%82%b97-50-cr-to-mizoram-state-sports-council-mssc-for-the-construction-of-motor-racing-track-and-sports-complex-in-lengpui-mamit-district-of-mizoram/ REC is pledging financial support of ₹7.50 Cr to Mizoram State Sports Council (MSSC) for the construction of a motor racing track and sports complex in Lengpui, Mamit district of MizoramAs of February 17, 2022 REC Limited, a Navratna company under the Ministry of Energy, has committed financial assistance of approximately ₹7.50 Cr. as part […]]]>

REC is pledging financial support of ₹7.50 Cr to Mizoram State Sports Council (MSSC) for the construction of a motor racing track and sports complex in Lengpui, Mamit district of Mizoram
As of February 17, 2022

REC Limited, a Navratna company under the Ministry of Energy, has committed financial assistance of approximately ₹7.50 Cr. as part of its CSR initiative for the “Construction of the REC – MSSC Motorsports Race Track and Sports Complex” in Lengpui, Mamit District of Mizoram. It will be the first and only race track in the North East region and it will host international events in the future.

Work under the project includes the construction of a 2 km long and 6 meter wide running track, a two-storey building as well as sports complex facilities such as an administration building and changing room, guest rooms , a conference room, a medical room, an official room, a cafeteria, a VIP room and equipment. Hall; Spectator galleries and parking areas, safety and security fencing, etc.

The Memorandum of Understanding (MoA) in this regard was signed between REC Foundation and MSSC in the presence of Shri Robert Romawia Royte, Honorable Minister of State (IC) – Sports and Youth Services, Mizoram, Shri V Lalengmaia, Director – Tourism Department, Shri Alex V. Chanwngthu, Addl. Residential Commissioner – Mizoram House, Shri John John Tanpuia, Secretary and CEO – MSSC, Shri Ajoy Choudhury, Director (Finance) – REC, Dr. Kajal, IAS, Executive Director (CSR) – REC; and other officials of REC Limited.

Warning

REC – Rural Electrification Company Ltd. published this content on February 17, 2022 and is solely responsible for the information contained therein. Distributed by publicunedited and unmodified, on February 18, 2022 05:30:02 UTC.

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Local schools raise over $75,000 and benefit Super Bowl Monday https://www.smlxtralarge.com/local-schools-raise-over-75000-and-benefit-super-bowl-monday/ Sat, 12 Feb 2022 03:00:35 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/local-schools-raise-over-75000-and-benefit-super-bowl-monday/ Super Bowl excitement is everywhere you turn this weekend in Cincinnati, including local schools where more than 20 superintendents canceled Monday classes to celebrate and school communities raised more than $75,000 for local charities. Some districts have set a fundraising goal so students can “earn” their day off, which has led to many generous donations […]]]>

Super Bowl excitement is everywhere you turn this weekend in Cincinnati, including local schools where more than 20 superintendents canceled Monday classes to celebrate and school communities raised more than $75,000 for local charities.

Some districts have set a fundraising goal so students can “earn” their day off, which has led to many generous donations flowing to Cincinnati-area nonprofits to help families in the need.

For subscribers: ‘Proud Son of Southeast Ohio’: What can Joe Burrow do for the region after the Super Bowl?

At the Southwest Local School District, facilities and communications director Mike Morris said the community has more than tripled its goal of $9,400 to the Sam Hubbard Foundation, which provides educational, medical and athletic resources to children and vulnerable families in Ohio.

“We love the hometown connections and the fact that support stays close to home,” Morris said in an email.

The final tally was $31,576, Morris said, with donations coming from the Southwestern school community and faraway places like Arizona and New York. Two local Harrison businesses — comprehensive orthodontic practice Boley Braces and Mexican restaurant El Mariachi — also made significant donations, Morris said.

Students accept donations for the Sam Hubbard Foundation from El Mariachi, a Mexican restaurant in Harrison.

Sycamore Schools students and staff raised $23,531 for Operation Give Back, a Blue Ash-based nonprofit that provides tutoring, food and support to children and parents in need and Sycamore Bridges, a community group that connects families in need with local advocates and donors, officials said.

The district’s original goal for families was $8,822. More than $18,000 was raised in less than a day, officials said.

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Jena Virga named executive director of the Old Dominion Athletic Foundation https://www.smlxtralarge.com/jena-virga-named-executive-director-of-the-old-dominion-athletic-foundation/ Tue, 08 Feb 2022 22:22:53 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/jena-virga-named-executive-director-of-the-old-dominion-athletic-foundation/ History links NORFOLK, Va. – President of Old Dominion University Brian O. Hemphill, Ph.D. and athletic director Dr. Wood Selig named Virgin Jena Executive Director of the Old Dominion Athletic Foundation (ODAF). Virga, who joined ODAF in 2010, was appointed Senior Associate Athletic Director for Development to oversee day-to-day athletic development […]]]>

NORFOLK, Va. – President of Old Dominion University Brian O. Hemphill, Ph.D. and athletic director Dr. Wood Selig named Virgin Jena Executive Director of the Old Dominion Athletic Foundation (ODAF).

Virga, who joined ODAF in 2010, was appointed Senior Associate Athletic Director for Development to oversee day-to-day athletic development efforts at ODU in 2014. In the summer of 2021, she was promoted to Senior Associate Athletic Director for development, a role in which she will continue to serve.

Working closely with the ODAF Board of Directors throughout her tenure, Virga successfully recruited 14 new ODAF Directors. Additionally, for more than a decade, she has helped the organization achieve over $120 million in philanthropic success, personally securing over $17 million of that record total.

Virga led the recent athletics fundraising initiative, beginning in July 2016, which raised nearly $60 million, 147% of the original athletics fundraising goal, at the supporting major capital projects, such as the $72 million renovation of SB Ballard Stadium, the $9 million fully privately funded The Mitchum Family Basketball Performance Center, the $1 million Paul Keyes Baseball Hitting Complex dollars and the start of the ODU women’s volleyball program.

In an expanded role as Executive Director of ODAF, she will be tasked and positioned to be the driving force behind all future philanthropic efforts relating to ODU sports facility capital projects, support for the improvement individual programs, endowment and planned giving efforts, and annual scholarship funding.

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Cleveland’s right to an attorney program is a success but seeks stable funding https://www.smlxtralarge.com/clevelands-right-to-an-attorney-program-is-a-success-but-seeks-stable-funding/ Wed, 02 Feb 2022 06:01:00 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/clevelands-right-to-an-attorney-program-is-a-success-but-seeks-stable-funding/ Cleveland’s Right to Counsel Act transforms the legal process for eviction, a consultant to the Cleveland City Council said Monday. “About 60 percent of eligible households in Cleveland who are at risk of eviction were represented in 2021. Sixty percent,” said Neil Steinkamp of New York-based consulting firm Stout, which reported on the program annually. […]]]>

Cleveland’s Right to Counsel Act transforms the legal process for eviction, a consultant to the Cleveland City Council said Monday.

“About 60 percent of eligible households in Cleveland who are at risk of eviction were represented in 2021. Sixty percent,” said Neil Steinkamp of New York-based consulting firm Stout, which reported on the program annually. “Before the right to a lawyer, it was around 1 or 2 percent.”

Under the law passed by the council in late 2019, any Cleveland tenant facing eviction who has an income below the poverty line and has a child at home is guaranteed a lawyer to fight their eviction. The law came into force in July 2020.

At a finance committee meeting on Monday, city council members learned of the program’s promising results so far.

According to the consultant’s report, the Legal Aid Society of Cleveland, which provides the lawyers for the program, was able to prevent the deportation of 93% of clients with right to counsel who wanted this outcome. And for those looking for rental assistance, they were able to get it for 83% of those customers.

But Legal Aid Executive Director Colleen Cotter told City Council that Cleveland will need to provide more money from the general fund budget to maintain the program.

Cotter said the legal aid budget for the program in 2021 is $2.7 million. Cleveland has set aside $300,000 to help pay for attorneys in 2021 and 2022. The gap was filled through philanthropic support and federal grants.

“You know you can’t count on this every year,” United Way of Greater Cleveland President August Napoli said. “We want to stay focused on what the city can do through the city council and the budget.”

Cotter expects the number of people eligible for the program to increase this year. A federal moratorium on evictions ended in September. And the Cuyahoga Metropolitan Housing Authority, the biggest source of cases in Cleveland, did not initiate any evictions in 2021.

She estimated it would cost $3.3 million to run the program in 2022.

“We’re ready to do more and serve a larger population,” Cotter said. “We need the city’s financial commitment to make this happen.”

Board members did not commit to requesting increased funding for the program.
Copyright 2022 WCPN. To learn more, visit WCPN.

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American Portfolios extends AP for LIFE Creative Residency through 2024 to benefit Ferguson, Mo. Creatives https://www.smlxtralarge.com/american-portfolios-extends-ap-for-life-creative-residency-through-2024-to-benefit-ferguson-mo-creatives/ Mon, 31 Jan 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/american-portfolios-extends-ap-for-life-creative-residency-through-2024-to-benefit-ferguson-mo-creatives/ The private and independent broker/dealer renews its commitment to fostering creative entrepreneurship by providing financial support and promoting financial literacy. HOLBROOK, NY –News Direct– American Portfolios Financial Services, Inc. American Portfolios Financial Services, Inc. (AP) – a private, independent broker/dealer providing services and support to financial professionals across the United States – announces AP extension […]]]>

The private and independent broker/dealer renews its commitment to fostering creative entrepreneurship by providing financial support and promoting financial literacy.

HOLBROOK, NY –News Direct– American Portfolios Financial Services, Inc.

American Portfolios Financial Services, Inc. (AP) – a private, independent broker/dealer providing services and support to financial professionals across the United States – announces AP extension for LIFE Creative Residency, a socially responsible program that benefits Ferguson, Missouri-based creative entrepreneurs committed to the LIFE Creative STL ecosystem. After two successful years of sponsorship, AP is increasing its funding over a two-year period beginning January 1, 2022, through its nonprofit arm, The American Portfolios Foundation, Inc.

“They say if you save a life, you’ve saved the world,” says CEO and Chairman Lon T. Dolber. “Financial literacy is a key part of this process, which is why American Portfolios decided to plant a ‘social responsibility’ flag in Ferguson, Missouri, a community that continues to be extremely underserved and often described as ground zero for Social Justice. AP’s mission is to help its affiliated investment professionals help their clients realize their American dreams. Everyone’s dreams matter, and we hope AP for LIFE Creative Residency will turn countless dreams into reality.

“We are thrilled and feel extremely fortunate to be able to partner with American Portfolios again for the benefit of young creatives and our community,” says Brian Owens, Founder of LIFE Creative STL Ecosystem. “We look forward to this expansion and to providing even more support and opportunities for our creative residents.”

Recognized by the financial services industry in two separate awards programs (ThinkAdvisor LUMINAIRES 2021 and 2021 WealthMangagement.com Industry Awards), AP for LIFE benefits LIFE Arts, Inc., the nonprofit arm of the LIFE Creative STL ecosystem founded by renowned musician Brian Owens. The Ferguson-based organization provides local youth in the North County, St. Louis area with a platform where they can fully express and develop their creative voice. AP for LIFE grants five talented artists (“residents”) much-needed funding, mentorship and financial advice, providing them with the essential resources to serve as role models and leaders within their communities. Five of AP’s affiliated investment professionals serve as financial literacy mentors to each of the residents, helping them plan for their future by managing a small investment account and stipend made available through residency funding.

“AP for LIFE has the potential to become a nationally recognized workforce, finance and workforce development program – one that shapes the way society understands the” creative,” where “creatives” are seen as “creative entrepreneurs” and whose art demonstrates a purposeful life that naturally translates into social impact,” says Darius Williams, Executive Director of Life Arts.

AP for LIFE addresses several fundamental social challenges for young creatives, including lack of financial support and wealth generation, scarcity of workforce opportunities, and pathways for creative entrepreneurs to leverage their platforms to identify and successfully meet the needs of their community. The program offers solutions to these challenges by providing financial advice; a small investment account and monthly stipend for each resident; social and creative mentoring; access to platform development and marketing resources; and opportunities to impact youth in surrounding communities. “For the first time in my life, I was able to be a full-time artist thanks to the incredible financial advice I received,” says Malena Smith, resident singer, songwriter and influencer. Fellow resident Joshua “Paco” Lee, CEO and founder of Crush Records Collective, agrees. “Between allowance and advice, I’m learning how to generate wealth in a way that supports my life and career in a variety of ways.” Smith and Lee will remain residents for part of the two-year program renewal; upon graduation, two new creatives will become residents. To date, three residents (T. Moore, Mike Bland and Stephanie Holly) have graduated from the program.

The residence helps boost commerce in the area, creating a booming source of income with countless tributaries. Over the past two years, AP for LIFE funding and mentorship has been instrumental in the production of many multimedia projects, artistic works and educational resources, including the Homegrown Soul concert and film series; the musicals “A New Holiday” and “An Intimate Christmas”, which star Malena Smith; Smith’s forthcoming untitled EP; and “Midnight Rails” by AP for LIFE Creative Resident Cecil McClendon. Additionally, numerous brands, companies and platforms, including AP for LIFE alum and Founder Stephanie Holly of Little Beats’ “Compositions for LIFE” therapeutic songwriting program for middle and high school students; Little Beats edutainment video series for young children; and AP for LIFE alum Maria A. Ellis’ Girl Conductor Edutainment Series – are part of several social programs and projects within the LIFE creative ecosystem, directly impacting over 100 local youth and mentoring over 15 creatives. .

The nonprofit’s focus for 2022 and beyond will be the Campus for Life, Arts, and Culture (CLAC), which is intended to serve North St. Louis County, through educational, therapeutic and workforce development, as well as arts programs. in a centralized space with the aim of cultivating and empowering students, creatives, entrepreneurs and community actors.

About US Wallets

Based in Holbrook, New York, American Portfolios Financial Services, Inc. (APFS) is an independent, full-service broker/dealer and member firm of FINRA and SIPC, offering a full range of financial services, including planning personal finance and retirement, securities trading, mutual funds, access to investment research, long-term care planning, insurance products and duty-free investing tax. Fee-based asset management is offered through its sister subsidiary, American Portfolios Advisors, Inc., (APA), an SEC-registered investment adviser. Both entities, along with the technology entity American Portfolios Advisory Solutions, LLC, collectively reside under the legal entity American Portfolios Holdings, Inc. (APH). Full-service securities brokerage is available through a clearing house relationship with Pershing, LLC, a BNY Mellon company, whose securities are held on a fully disclosed basis. The firm supports independent investment professionals, including registered assistants and unregistered associates, nationwide.

American Portfolios has numerous recognitions from a number of industry publications and organizations. This recognition includes: Multiple Broker of the Year* (Division III) awards from Investment Advisor magazine; several ThinkAdvisor LUMINAIRES awards; multiple WealthManagement.com Industry Award finalists and awards in multiple categories**; Corporate Citizen of the Year by Long Island Business News; multiple rankings among the best companies to work for in New York State by the New York State Society for Human Resources Management (NYS-SHRM) and the Best Companies Group (BCG); and one of the best places to work on Long Island.

*Based on a survey of Registered Representatives conducted by Investment Advisor magazine. The best rated brokers/dealers by their representatives receive the “Broker/Dealer (B/D) of the Year” award.

** Wealthmanagement.com Industry Award finalists are selected by an independent judging panel of industry subject matter experts. Reward is based on support provided to AP Affiliates and does not reflect public customers or their account performance.

About American Portfolio Foundation, Inc.

American Portfolios Foundation, Inc. (APF), a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that was originally established in New York in 2004 and amended in 2018 and headquartered in Holbrook, New York, is designed as a non-profit organization designed to advance awareness, assistance and support for charitable causes. Board members include AP CEO Lon T. Dolber, chairman; AP Administrative Director Dalchand Laljit, Vice President; and AP Chief Financial Officer Damon Joyner, Treasurer/Secretary. In addition, various roles are held by PA headquarters staff. The Board meets quarterly to discuss its existing relationships with various charities and to determine the direction of various upcoming initiatives that will require the services and support of the Foundation.

About LIFE Arts, Inc.

LIFE Arts, Inc. is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that provides artistic resources, opportunities, mentorship, and positive experiences to help students develop the qualities and skills they need to live up to their God-given potential. The organization believes that through leadership skills and the discipline of the arts, the youth of St. Louis can be a driving force, shaping the change we all so desperately want to see happen.

AP for LIFE benefits LIFE Arts, Inc., the nonprofit arm of the LIFE Creative STL ecosystem founded by renowned musician Brian Owens (top row, middle).

Contact Details

U.S. Portfolios Financial Services, Inc.

Melissa Grappone

+1 631-439-4600

apcorpcomm@americanportfolios.com

Company Website

Front Page

See source version at newsdirect.com: https://newsdirect.com/news/american-portfolios-extends-ap-for-life-creative-residency-through-2024-to-benefit-ferguson-mo-creatives-679525865

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Portland overwhelmed by growing number of asylum seekers https://www.smlxtralarge.com/portland-overwhelmed-by-growing-number-of-asylum-seekers/ Wed, 26 Jan 2022 04:14:00 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/portland-overwhelmed-by-growing-number-of-asylum-seekers/ According to city staff, Portland is hosting 727 asylum seekers at its shelters and 10 area hotels. PORTLAND, Maine — As the number of asylum seekers in Portland increases, officials say the city is becoming increasingly overwhelmed. “We see the numbers increasing week by week,” said Mufalo Chitam, executive director of the Maine Immigrant Rights […]]]>

According to city staff, Portland is hosting 727 asylum seekers at its shelters and 10 area hotels.

PORTLAND, Maine — As the number of asylum seekers in Portland increases, officials say the city is becoming increasingly overwhelmed.

“We see the numbers increasing week by week,” said Mufalo Chitam, executive director of the Maine Immigrant Rights Coalition.

Every day, she and her team work with the record number of asylum seekers arriving in Maine to help them.

“Our staff is so stretched. We can only clone ourselves so many times,” Chitam said.

The main reason MIRC and other community organizations say they feel burnt out is the growing number of people in need of services.

According to Portland Health and Human Services Director Kristen Dow, the city is currently home to 727 asylum seekers. That’s more than 200 more asylum seekers than in 2019, when Portland Expo was used as an emergency shelter.

“Our shelters are full, and they have been for some time. So because they are full, we had to use hotels,” Dow said.

With the city’s emergency shelters at capacity, Portland housed asylum seekers and other homeless people in ten different hotels across five different municipalities. In total, the city provides accommodation for 1,198 people.

“This calls on everyone to come together so they can provide support to newcomers,” said Charles Mugabe, director of case management for Catholic Charities Maine.

CMM is another organization working closely with asylum seekers to provide services.

In addition to working with asylum seekers and other new Mainers, CMM is also a licensed resettlement agency working to support refugees arriving in Maine. According to Mugabe, CMM helped resettle 104 Afghan refugees.

There is a difference in the way refugees and asylum seekers are taken care of. According to U.S. Citizen and Immigrant Services, refugee status is a form of protection that may be granted to people who meet the refugee definition and who are of special humanitarian interest to the United States.

Refugees are usually people outside their country who are unable or unwilling to return home because they fear serious harm. Many refugees are supported upon arrival in the county through resettlement agencies like CMM.

Asylum status is a form of protection available to people who meet the refugee definition but are already in the United States seeking protection because they have been persecuted or fear persecution because of their race. , their religion, their nationality, their membership of a particular social group. political group or opinion. Chitam and Dow said there was no concentrated effort to support asylum seekers like there is for refugees.

Asylum seekers also cannot apply for permission to work in the United States at the same time they apply for asylum. In many cases, asylum seekers cannot apply for a work permit until one year after an asylum application has been completed.

With fewer coordinated services provided to asylum seekers, the city of Portland and social service organizations have worked around the clock to care for them.

“Frankly, it’s going to take a broader approach than a municipality can tackle,” Dow said.

Dow added that Portland staff are in communication with the state government, looking to find ways to better support new Mainers.

“We are trying to ask the state to re-engage in this crisis,” Chitam said.

Another concern of Portland City Hall is funding hotels for the homeless and new Mainers. Currently, the state is reimbursing Portland for 70% of hotel costs used to support those who are not housed through general assistance, according to Dow.

FEMA reimburses the remaining 30% of the costs. Dow said FEMA funding could expire in April.

“It’s something that Portland has endorsed, and hopefully we can have conversations about it really being a more regional and more statewide approach,” Dow said.

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