Support Organization – SMLXtlarge http://www.smlxtralarge.com/ Tue, 12 Oct 2021 06:32:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-5-150x150.png Support Organization – SMLXtlarge http://www.smlxtralarge.com/ 32 32 A list of mental health resources for people of color in Duke and Durham https://www.smlxtralarge.com/a-list-of-mental-health-resources-for-people-of-color-in-duke-and-durham/ Tue, 12 Oct 2021 03:05:00 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/a-list-of-mental-health-resources-for-people-of-color-in-duke-and-durham/ The Chronicle has compiled a list of mental health resources that people of color can access. The following list includes organizations in Duke and Durham. Resources for people of color Radical Healing: (919) 238-1120 This organization has a multiracial and multicultural campus in Durham for wellness and healing. The collective includes counselors, artists, clinical psychologists […]]]>

The Chronicle has compiled a list of mental health resources that people of color can access. The following list includes organizations in Duke and Durham.

Resources for people of color

Radical Healing: (919) 238-1120

This organization has a multiracial and multicultural campus in Durham for wellness and healing. The collective includes counselors, artists, clinical psychologists and counselors, among others, and works with clients to deliver services on a sliding pay scale.

List of culturally competent resources in Wake County NAMI: (919) 848-4490

This website offers a list of national and local resources for different identity groups to find mental health resources. The list includes reference sites for therapists, articles with self-care tips, and links to other resource listings.

Resources for the Latinx community

Latinx Therapist

This database provides a list of therapists who conduct online visits. The organization seeks to connect Latinx clients with service providers who can provide culturally competent care. The website’s online tool allows people to narrow their search to the nearest areas.

El Futuro: (919) 688-7101

This outpatient clinic provides clinical and evidence-based mental health services for Latinx families. They offer all of their services in English and Spanish.

Resources for the Asian community

Directory of APISAA therapists

This resource, compiled by the Asian Mental Health Collective, provides a list of Asian, Pacific Islander, and South Asian therapists in North Carolina. The organization seeks to connect AAPI clients with service providers who can provide culturally competent care.

Kiran, Inc: (919) 831-4203

This non-profit organization seeks to empower South Asian victims of domestic violence. Their services include a 24-hour crisis line, security planning assistance, translation assistance, and resource referrals.

Resources for the black community

NAMI Durham Anxiety and Stress Support Group for African Americans

The Durham Chapter of the National Mental Health Alliance offers a weekly Zoom Support Group for Durham residents of the African American community to find solace in sharing their feelings of anxiety and stress with other people.

Duke Health’s list of race-related mental health resources

This website provides the Duke community with a list of therapy, education and support services available to black people.


Anisha reddy

Anisha Reddy is a sophomore at Trinity and associate editor of The Chronicle’s 117th volume.


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Arts and Education Council funds St. Louis groups for trauma healing https://www.smlxtralarge.com/arts-and-education-council-funds-st-louis-groups-for-trauma-healing/ Sun, 10 Oct 2021 21:52:00 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/arts-and-education-council-funds-st-louis-groups-for-trauma-healing/ A dozen St. Louis-area organizations that use the arts to help people cope with trauma will share $ 120,000 in grants from the Arts and Education Council. Recipients include Prison Performing Arts, Intercultural Music Initiative, and St. Louis Artworks. “These populations they serve have suffered a lot of trauma from various places. And you have […]]]>

A dozen St. Louis-area organizations that use the arts to help people cope with trauma will share $ 120,000 in grants from the Arts and Education Council.

Recipients include Prison Performing Arts, Intercultural Music Initiative, and St. Louis Artworks.

“These populations they serve have suffered a lot of trauma from various places. And you have to take unconventional paths to healing, ”said Jessireé Jenkins, Manager of Grants and Programs at the Arts and Education Council. “And a lot of these organizations have figured out how to do that.”

The donor distributed $ 115,000 in the first year of its Arts and Healing Initiative, Last year. The organization has funding for three other rounds of annual grants to similar groups.

The latest grant recipients also include St. Louis Classical Guitar, a non-profit organization that provides music education to students in St. Louis, Jennings, Hazelwood and the Ferguson-Florissant School District.

Funding from the Arts and Education Council will support a new 15-week program designed for young adults struggling with substance abuse, including teenagers recently released from Clayton Juvenile Detention Center.

Participants will learn to build and play their own guitars, said Travis Lewis, general manager of St. Louis Classical Guitar.

“It promotes mastery and achievement,” Lewis said. “For a lot of kids who find themselves in the system, they haven’t had the opportunity to see something come to an end and present this work to the public. “

Participants will display their finished guitars at a local art gallery and have the chance to offer them for sale.

Bread and Roses Missouri will provide grant funds to its Workers’ theater project, which recruits the working class of Saint-Louis and uses the theater to examine the roots of poverty and inequality in the Saint-Louis region.

The Angels group project connects music therapists with survivors of sexual abuse and domestic violence. Rustic Root Sanctuary, a farm in Spanish Lake, will lead art projects at a local farmers market.

Your words STL will use his grant to continue a project he launched in 2015, bringing together students from schools north and south of the so-called Delmar divides in Saint-Louis – a physical border marking the gap in wealth and quality of life indicators created by generations of disinvestment from neighborhoods north of Boulevard Delmar. Housing segregation has been enforced for decades by local authorities, bankers and real estate developers through redlining and withholding of loans from black applicants.

The fourth, fifth and sixth graders convened by YourWords STL get together in small groups to write and share poetry. They also attend workshops and participate in discussions about race and identity.

“At the root of all of our programming is the idea that if one can speak out and feel heard, there can be real physical healing from trauma,” said Anna Ojascastro Guzon, co-founder and program director of YourWords STL. “If young people can use language to get to know and get to know each other, we can bring about racial healing and also healing at the individual level. “

Previous sessions of the program have connected students from Parkway Northeast Middle School in Creve Coeur and Margaret of Scotland School in Shaw with students from St. Louis Catholic Academy in Penrose and Loyola Academy in Grand Center.

Follow Jérémy on Twitter: @jeremydgoodwin



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Post Falls FOP announces amendments https://www.smlxtralarge.com/post-falls-fop-announces-amendments/ Sat, 09 Oct 2021 08:08:08 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/post-falls-fop-announces-amendments/ POST FALLS – The Post Falls Fraternal Order of Police Lodge has announced its support for the Post Falls municipal election in 2021. By unanimous vote, the following candidates have the support of the organization: • Ron Jacobson, mayor • Linda Wilhelm, advisor • Alan Wolfe, advisor • Steve Anthony, advisor As part of the […]]]>


POST FALLS – The Post Falls Fraternal Order of Police Lodge has announced its support for the Post Falls municipal election in 2021. By unanimous vote, the following candidates have the support of the organization:

• Ron Jacobson, mayor

• Linda Wilhelm, advisor

• Alan Wolfe, advisor

• Steve Anthony, advisor

As part of the approval process, letters were sent to all applicants inviting them to submit a written statement for consideration. All statements received were provided to lodge members for consideration and then put to a vote.

These approved candidates are incumbents and have years of experience in leading the Town of Post Falls. They have always supported public safety efforts which have led to low crime rates. These candidates have supported our local police officers through some of the most difficult times in recent memory, including one downed officer in the line of duty.

Lodge President Neil Uhrig said of these candidates: “Quality police services only exist where communities support them and where they have city leaders who make public safety a priority. priority. One need only look at Portland or Seattle to see how police departments struggle when their city council members fail to provide good leadership. Post Falls is truly fortunate to have such an incredible group of elected city leaders. We are successful because they support us. In this election, we have theirs.

The Fraternal Order of Police (FOP) Post Falls Lodge is made up of Post Falls law enforcement officers. The Lodge is not a union or a collective bargaining unit; rather, it is a fraternal organization that provides support to law enforcement officers and community charitable programs.


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Manatee facility to help support underserved foster children, single mothers https://www.smlxtralarge.com/manatee-facility-to-help-support-underserved-foster-children-single-mothers/ Fri, 08 Oct 2021 09:36:30 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/manatee-facility-to-help-support-underserved-foster-children-single-mothers/ PALMETTO – A national organization will expand its reach in Manatee County with the opening of a new center for vulnerable children and families. The One More Child Compassion Center, a national faith-based organization that will open a new Palmetto center on Monday, works with struggling families, foster parents and children, trafficked persons and single […]]]>

PALMETTO – A national organization will expand its reach in Manatee County with the opening of a new center for vulnerable children and families.

The One More Child Compassion Center, a national faith-based organization that will open a new Palmetto center on Monday, works with struggling families, foster parents and children, trafficked persons and single mothers by providing services, resources and support.

The Manatee Center is the brainchild of Toni and Paul Azinger, a former professional golfer and ESPN golf analyst. Toni Azinger has been involved with One More Child for the past four years as a volunteer.

After visiting the Lakeland center, she asked her husband to help fund a center in the Suncoast area that they have lived in for decades.

“I saw the Lakeland Center and how well it works in their community, and I was like, ‘We need it in our community,’ said Toni Azinger, who lives in Bradenton.

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The aim of the center is to provide care to injured people in the community, she said. Through scheduled appointments, customers can get financial advice, receive discounted food and products, purchase clothes from the on-site boutique, and more.

The 10,000 square foot center is located in Palmetto but serves all of the Manatee and Sarasota counties.

“During the pandemic, so many people were suffering, some still are,” said Toni Azinger. “I just want to give back, and if we all help one more child, the world would be a better place. We’re excited to finally open and help a lot of people in our community.

One More Child’s will host an opening ceremony at 11 a.m. Monday at 3478 Bouwer Court E. in Palmetto. For more information on volunteering or services, contact Emily Petrilli at emily.petrilli@onemorechild.org.

Samantha Gholar Weires covers social justice news for the Herald-Tribune and USA TODAY Network. Connect with her at sgholar@gannett.com or on Twitter: @samanthagweires


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Boston mayoral candidates turn to black community for support – The Daily Free Press https://www.smlxtralarge.com/boston-mayoral-candidates-turn-to-black-community-for-support-the-daily-free-press/ Thu, 07 Oct 2021 05:52:23 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/boston-mayoral-candidates-turn-to-black-community-for-support-the-daily-free-press/ A polling station in Concord, New Hampshire. Boston 2021 mayoral candidates Annissa Essaibi George and Michelle Wu are working to win base support from Kim Janey, Andrea Campbell and John Barros in the September 14 preliminary election. SOPHIE PARK / DFP FILE By: Jit Ping Lee As they enter the last month of campaigning before […]]]>
A polling station in Concord, New Hampshire. Boston 2021 mayoral candidates Annissa Essaibi George and Michelle Wu are working to win base support from Kim Janey, Andrea Campbell and John Barros in the September 14 preliminary election. SOPHIE PARK / DFP FILE

By: Jit Ping Lee

As they enter the last month of campaigning before the general election, mayoral candidates Annissa Essaibi George and Michelle Wu vie for the support of those who previously voted for their defeated rivals in the September 14 preliminary elections.

Third to fifth place finalists Andrea Campbell, Kim Janey and John Barros won a total of 42.38% of the vote cast in the primary. These voters must now decide between Wu and Essaibi George on November 4.

Ed Burley, co-chair of the Jamaica Plain Progressives board, said the elimination of all black candidates in the preliminary elections was “shocking.”

“I think there is a big disappointment because people thought that this election, that there would definitely be a black mayor, or at the very least, a black finalist,” he said. “I feel like there is a lot of disappointment and frustration.”

Burley said he believed that because of this, turnout among black voters in Boston was “certainly a concern” – which makes the campaign all the more important.

MassINC Polling Group research director Richard Parr said it’s important to note where the majority of the losing pre-candidates’ electoral base comes from to predict who they might favor in a general election.

Parr added that Wu has done better than Essaibi George in the majority of areas where Janey, Campbell or Barros have won.

While Janey only placed fourth in the primary, she won the second most ridings, losing only to Wu. Election results Plans show Janey won majority minority areas of Roxbury, Mattapan, parts of Dorchester and Hyde Park.

“[Wu] tended to do better than Annissa Essaibi George in most of these places, “said Parr,” which is a sign that she is probably better positioned in these constituencies to garner more votes in the November election. “

However, State Representative Nika Elugardo D-Mass said voter turnout could be slowed due to the loss of a black mayoral candidate.

“I think it will be a big challenge to motivate people to come out,” Elguardo said. “Because I think historically African Americans don’t vote when they are discouraged in large percentages. And I think people are discouraged.

Burley said Wu and Essaibi George will have to work to win his vote and that of other black voters through their words, policies and behavior ahead of the election.

“For some people, either they don’t vote or, I think, it could be a significant number of black voters who decided to write a candidate who is not on the ballot,” did he declare.

Essaibi George and Wu both made concerted attempts to engage black voters.

Wu was recently approved by Janey and State Representative Ayanna Pressley, D-Mass, the first woman of color elected to Boston City Council and the first woman of color from Massachusetts elected to the United States Congress.

Janey explicitly called out the importance of the black vote in her speech of support.

“The black vote is very important to this election,” Janey said at the September 25 event. “It’s important for the future of Boston.”

Essaibi George on Tuesday launched its 46-page “Agenda for Equity, Inclusion and Justice” – which includes a $ 50 million fund that can be deployed directly to support black, Pacific Islander, Latin entrepreneurs. Americans and Asians within the first 100 days of their tenure.

“Creating a more equitable, inclusive and just Boston will be a burden I will intentionally and deliberately work for every day as mayor. Essaibi George said in a press release Tuesday.

Reverend Edwin Johnson of St. Mary’s Episcopal Church in Dorchester, where a majority of the congregation identifies as black, said some of the biggest issues for the congregation in this election are affordable housing, the fight against community violence and access to employment.

“Housing, security and employment are probably the biggest problems for our people,” he said.

Ashawn Dabney-Small, founder and executive director of The Black Society – a nonprofit community organization working with black and brown students in Boston – highlighted education and the police as other central concerns for the community.

“The education system has repeatedly failed black and brown students,” Dabney-Small said.

Part of Essaibi George’s agenda for equity, inclusion and justice is to increase confidence in the police service by requiring the posting of body camera images within 24 hours of an incident and double the community service budget of the police department, as well as fill up the Boston police. Recommendations of the reform working group.

However, Dabney-Small said the plan “would continue to take money from blacks and continue to take money from the city that could be allocated elsewhere.”

“The first thing we want to see corrected is the relationship restored within the Boston Police Department,” he said.

Elugardo noted the difference in the campaign styles of the two candidates when trying to understand the issues facing the black community.

She said Wu spent more time talking to community leaders to get a better idea of ​​the issues facing the black community while Essabi George focused her time on “grandmothers and grandfathers. and young people who are just in the community “.

Elugardo said that while both approaches are important, the “intellectual wisdom” on how to dismantle the structural problems facing people of color is also very essential.

A forum for black voters sponsored by four black clergy organizations brought together the two candidates on September 22. Johnson said he returned from the forum “full of hope” – that “our city will be in good hands anyway.”

“At the end of the day, we’re looking for candidates who are interested in people who don’t have that much voice,” he said. “It is the candidates who are willing to come to these places and interact with us who will be the candidates who are most able to represent us.”


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Myocarditis after Covid-19 vaccination in a large healthcare organization https://www.smlxtralarge.com/myocarditis-after-covid-19-vaccination-in-a-large-healthcare-organization/ Wed, 06 Oct 2021 21:01:28 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/myocarditis-after-covid-19-vaccination-in-a-large-healthcare-organization/ The patients Between December 20, 2020 and May 24, 2021, a total of 2,558,421 Clalit Health Services members received at least one dose of the BNT162b2 Covid-19 mRNA vaccine; of these patients, 2,401,605 (94%) received two doses. Initially, 159 potential cases of myocarditis were identified using ICD-9 codes within 42 days of receiving the first […]]]>

The patients

Between December 20, 2020 and May 24, 2021, a total of 2,558,421 Clalit Health Services members received at least one dose of the BNT162b2 Covid-19 mRNA vaccine; of these patients, 2,401,605 (94%) received two doses. Initially, 159 potential cases of myocarditis were identified using ICD-9 codes within 42 days of receiving the first dose of vaccine. After adjudication, 54 of these cases were considered to meet study criteria for a diagnosis of myocarditis. Of these cases, 41 were classified as mild in severity, 12 as intermediate and 1 as fulminant.

Of the 105 cases that did not meet the study criteria for a diagnosis of myocarditis, 78 were recoding of previous diagnoses of myocarditis with no new event, 16 did not have enough data available to meet the diagnostic criteria, and 7 preceded the first dose of vaccine; in 4 cases, a diagnosis of a condition other than myocarditis was determined to be more likely (Fig. S1). Community health records were available for all patients identified as potentially having myocarditis. Baseline hospital discharge summaries were available for 55 of 81 potential cases (68%) that did not register events and for 38 of 54 cases (70%) that met study criteria.

Characteristics of the study population and of the cases of myocarditis at baseline.

Characteristics of patients with myocarditis are provided in Table 1. The median age of the patients was 27 years (interquartile range [IQR], 21 to 35) and 94% were boys and men. Two patients had contracted Covid-19 before receiving the vaccine (respectively 125 days and 186 days earlier). Most patients (83%) had no coexisting medical condition; 13% were receiving treatment for chronic illnesses. One patient had mild left ventricular dysfunction prior to vaccination.

Kaplan-Meier estimates of myocarditis at 42 days.

The cumulative incidence of myocarditis over a 42-day period after receiving the first dose of the 2019 BNT162b2 messenger RNA coronavirus disease vaccine (Covid-19) is shown. Myocarditis was diagnosed in 54 patients out of a global population of 2,558,421 vaccinated people enrolled in the largest healthcare organization in Israel. The vertical line at 21 days indicates the median day of administration of the second dose of vaccine. The shaded area shows the 95% confidence interval.

Of the patients with myocarditis, 37 (69%) were diagnosed after the second vaccine dose, with a median interval of 21 days (IQR, 21 to 22) between doses. A cumulative incidence curve of myocarditis after vaccination is shown in Figure 1. The distribution of days from vaccination to onset of myocarditis is shown in Figure S2. Both figures show events occurring throughout the post-vaccination period and indicate an increased incidence after the second dose.

Incidence of myocarditis

Incidence of myocarditis 42 days after receiving the first dose of vaccine, stratified by age, sex and disease severity.

The estimated overall incidence of myocarditis within 42 days of receiving the first dose per 100,000 people vaccinated was 2.13 cases (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.56 to 2.70), which included an incidence of 4.12 (95% CI, 2.99 to 5.26) in men and 0.23 (95% CI, 0 to 0, 49) in women (Table 2). Among all patients aged 16 to 29, the incidence per 100,000 was 5.49 (95% CI, 3.59 to 7.39); among those who were 30 years of age or older, the incidence was 1.13 (95% CI, 0.66 to 1.60). The highest incidence (10.69 cases per 100,000 population; 95% CI, 6.93 to 14.46) was observed in male patients aged 16 to 29 years. In the general population, the incidence per 100,000 people by disease severity was 1.62 (95% CI, 1.12 to 2.11) for mild myocarditis, 0.47 (95% CI %, 0.21 to 0.74) for myocarditis intermediate and 0.04 (95% CI, 0 to 0.12) for fulminant myocarditis. Within each disease severity stratum, the incidence was higher in males than females and higher in patients aged 16 to 29 than in those aged 30 or older.

Clinical and laboratory results

Presentation, clinical course and follow-up of 54 patients with myocarditis after vaccination.

The clinical and laboratory features of myocarditis are presented in Table 3 and Table S3. The telltale symptom was chest pain in 82% of cases. Vital signs on admission were generally normal; 1 patient presented with hemodynamic instability, and none required inotropic or vasopressor support or mechanical circulatory support during presentation. Electrocardiography (ECG) at presentation showed ST segment elevation in 20 of 38 patients (53%) for whom ECG data was available on admission; ECG results were normal in 8 of 38 patients (21%), while minor abnormalities (including T wave changes, atrial fibrillation, and unsupported ventricular tachycardia) were detected in the remainder. patients. The median peak troponin T level was 680 ng per liter (IQR, 275-2075) in 41 patients for which data were available, and the median creatine kinase level was 487 U per liter (IQR, 230-1193 ) in 28 patients for which data were available.

During hospitalization, cardiogenic shock leading to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation developed in 1 patient. None of the other patients required inotropic or vasopressor support or mechanical ventilation. However, 5% had unsupported ventricular tachycardia and 3% had atrial fibrillation. A myocardial biopsy sample obtained from 1 patient showed perivascular infiltration of lymphocytes and eosinophils. The median hospital stay was 3 days (IQR, 2 to 4). Overall, 65% of patients were discharged from the hospital without any ongoing medical treatment.

A patient with pre-existing heart disease died the day after discharge from an unspecified cause. A patient who had a history of pericarditis and had been admitted to hospital for myocarditis had three more admissions for recurrent pericarditis, with no further myocardial involvement after the initial episode. Additional clinical descriptions are provided in Table S4.

Echocardiography and other cardiac imaging

Echocardiographic results were available for 48 of 54 patients (89%) (Table S5). Among these patients, left ventricular function was normal on admission in 71% of patients. Of the 14 patients (29%) who had any degree of left ventricular dysfunction, 17% had mild dysfunction, 4% had mild to moderate dysfunction, 4% had moderate dysfunction, 2% had moderate to severe and 2% had severe malfunction malfunction. Among the 14 patients with some degree of left ventricular dysfunction at presentation, follow-up echocardiography during initial admission showed normal function in 4 patients and similar dysfunction in the remaining 10. The mean left ventricular function at outlet was 57.5 ± 6.1%, which was similar to the mean value at presentation. At a median follow-up of 25 days (IQR, 14 to 37) after discharge, echocardiographic follow-up was available for 5 of 10 patients whose last left ventricular workup before discharge showed some degree of dysfunction. Of these patients, all had normal left ventricular function; echocardiography follow-up results were not available for the remaining 5 patients.

Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 15 patients (28%): in 5 patients on initial admission and in 10 patients at a median of 44 days (IQR, 21 to 70) after discharge. In all cases, left ventricular function was normal, with a mean ejection fraction of 61 ± 6%. Quantitative assessment data for late enhancement with gadolinium were available in 11 patients, with a median value of 5% (IQR, 1 to 15) (Table S6).


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Aspen deaf camp sued by former director for arrears https://www.smlxtralarge.com/aspen-deaf-camp-sued-by-former-director-for-arrears/ Wed, 06 Oct 2021 04:30:00 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/aspen-deaf-camp-sued-by-former-director-for-arrears/ One of the buildings at Aspen Deaf and Hard of Hearing Camp in Old Snowmass, pictured here on Sunday May 23, 2021.Austin Colbert / The Snowmass Sun The former executive director of the Aspen Deaf and Hard of Hearing Camp is suing the non-profit organization over claims owed to it for nearly $ 130,000 in […]]]>

One of the buildings at Aspen Deaf and Hard of Hearing Camp in Old Snowmass, pictured here on Sunday May 23, 2021.
Austin Colbert / The Snowmass Sun

The former executive director of the Aspen Deaf and Hard of Hearing Camp is suing the non-profit organization over claims owed to it for nearly $ 130,000 in compensation.

The lawsuit of Lesa Thomas, who served as the camp’s executive director for nearly three years until September 2018, was filed in Pitkin County District Court on September 15. The lawsuit noted that the association also received a written request for money and was given 14 days to heal Thomas.

The nonprofit did not respond to the letter, and serving the lawsuit on the organization is the next step, according to labor and employment attorney David Lichtenstein, whose Denver-based company has filed the complaint.



“We gave them time to do the right thing,” Lichtenstein said on Tuesday.

The association declined to comment.



“We have nothing to share at this time,” said Karen Immerso, treasurer of the Aspen Camp board, via an email message.

Thomas, who now lives in Texas, served as the organization’s executive director from December 15, 2015 until September 18, 2018, according to the complaint. His employment contract included room and board and an annual salary of $ 100,000, according to the lawsuit.

Yet in those three years at the helm, Thomas has not been compensated once for his agreed salary, according to the lawsuit. She received $ 71,833 in 2016, $ 46,250 in 2017 and $ 25,833 in 2018 when her employment ended in mid-September. A total of $ 127,236 is owed to Thomas from his employer, and the lawsuit said it would seek interest under Colorado’s wage claims law because of the deaf camp’s failure to respond to the ‘notice requiring payment.

“In the event that the defendant does not pay Ms. Thomas ‘salary and compensation within 14 days of Ms. Thomas’ written request, Ms. Thomas will be entitled to recover her unpaid wages and compensation, plus a penalty of 125 % of the first $ 7,500 of the unpaid amount and 50% of any additional amount, ”the lawsuit said.

The costume also made a claim for breach of contact.

Lichtenstein declined to answer questions regarding the nature of Thomas’ exit from the organization or why she continued to work when she was underpaid.

In an Aspen Times article published in March, Immerso acknowledged that the organization was “in debt” by the time Thomas, its last paid director, broke up.

The organization, which owns a 17-acre camp at Old Snowmass, suspended its summer programming for two years before returning last summer. The pandemic was part of the reason for the hiatus, as well as the financial challenges.

Immerso thanked the community and volunteers for their support this year, in a letter published in The Aspen Times in August.

“The two family camps in July served 19 adults, 15 children and nine families. Five volunteers from each camp worked hard to organize outdoor activities, prepared and served meals and revived the hopes of the camp’s founders and supporters in 1967, ”the letter reads.

Immerso also said the program is on the rebound.

“With the help of so many volunteers over the past two years, the camp facilities are in their best condition to welcome groups again. While this is a gentle relaunch of the camp’s mission, the Board of Directors and its supportive community will continue to move forward with its evolving vision of delivering educational experiences on its campus. unique and beautiful.

For the tax year ending October 31, 2019, the Aspen camp generated $ 75,141 in income – almost two-thirds from grants – and expenses of $ 91,677, according to the form’s tax returns. 990 of the non-profit organization, which are common knowledge.

It came out of operational red for the tax year ending October 31, 2020, with total income of $ 112,611 and $ 83,036 in expenses, according to tax records.

rcarroll@aspentimes.com


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“Meeting of two worlds” | United States Mission to the Organization of American States https://www.smlxtralarge.com/meeting-of-two-worlds-united-states-mission-to-the-organization-of-american-states/ Tue, 05 Oct 2021 17:26:55 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/meeting-of-two-worlds-united-states-mission-to-the-organization-of-american-states/ Remarks fromBradley A. FredenActing Permanent Representative of the United StatesOctober 5, 2021 Thank you, Mr. Chairman, the United States welcomes the opportunity to come together to recognize Spain’s role and contributions to our hemisphere and to the OAS. In doing so, we recognize the Meeting of two worlds, el Día de la Hispanidad, Discovery day, […]]]>

Remarks from
Bradley A. Freden
Acting Permanent Representative of the United States
October 5, 2021

Thank you, Mr. Chairman, the United States welcomes the opportunity to come together to recognize Spain’s role and contributions to our hemisphere and to the OAS. In doing so, we recognize the Meeting of two worlds, el Día de la Hispanidad, Discovery day, the day of the Raza, or Columbus Day, as it is still popularly known here in the United States.

Mr. President, my delegation would like to begin by thanking Ambassador Carmen Montón, Permanent Observer of Spain to the OAS, for Spain’s continued commitment and leadership within our community of member states and OAS observers.

We would like to congratulate the Ambassador and her government – as well as the generosity of the Spanish people – for their advocacy, commitment, and support for key OAS programs and initiatives that are essential to the advancement of the core values ​​of this institution, as enshrined in the Inter-American Democratic Charter.

In particular, Spain’s consistent and long-standing support for OAS election observation missions and other key functions – which rely almost entirely on voluntary donor support – has been particularly vital in strengthening the democracy in our region and serves as an example to others.

President, notwithstanding the actions of a 16emonarchy of the century that bears little resemblance to modern Spain, we note that Spain’s contributions to our inter-American community are also framed by a rich history of intellectual and cultural exchanges and interactions,

Spain also played an important role in the independence of the United States, as part of its conflict with Great Britain. Spain declared war on Britain as an ally of France, itself an ally of the American colonies. The Spanish fleet attacked the British West Indies and the British in Central America, forcing the British to divert their forces to defend their possessions.

Spain contributed to the American Revolution from the start by secretly providing money, gunpowder, and supplies to American revolutionaries. Our common history and democratic goals deserve reflection and renewed commitment here at the OAS, especially in the context of today’s increasingly multilateral world.

We again thank the Spanish government for its rich contributions to our society and to the OAS.

Thank you.


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Adams County Commissioner Chaz Tedesco Moves to Dem Primary for New 8th CD | New https://www.smlxtralarge.com/adams-county-commissioner-chaz-tedesco-moves-to-dem-primary-for-new-8th-cd-new/ Tue, 05 Oct 2021 00:21:21 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/adams-county-commissioner-chaz-tedesco-moves-to-dem-primary-for-new-8th-cd-new/ Adams County Commissioner Charles “Chaz” Tedesco joined the Democratic primary on Monday to represent Colorado’s new 8th Congressional District. “Workers need a voice in Congress from someone who has lived the life of a worker,” Tedesco, a Navy veteran and former union president, said in a statement. “I know what it’s like to feel forgotten […]]]>

Adams County Commissioner Charles “Chaz” Tedesco joined the Democratic primary on Monday to represent Colorado’s new 8th Congressional District.

“Workers need a voice in Congress from someone who has lived the life of a worker,” Tedesco, a Navy veteran and former union president, said in a statement.

“I know what it’s like to feel forgotten and left behind. Politicians come and go and make all kinds of promises without fully making meaningful improvements to our lives. I will make you a promise today: I will never forget you and I will always show myself for all of us, every day. “

Tedesco said in a campaign email sent on Monday: “We can beat this pandemic, give people access to better health care, strengthen voting rights and tackle the climate crisis. But we have to do it. together.”

Tedesco joins Democratic state representative Yadira Caraveo de Thornton, a pediatrician, at an elementary school in the district, whose boundaries have yet to be finalized. Political newcomer Giulianna “Jewels” Gray, wedding photographer, is the only Republican to have applied for the seat.

Tedesco was elected last year for a third term as commissioner. He worked for more than three decades as a master industrial mechanic at Koppers Inc., an international manufacturing company with a factory in Denver, and was president of United Steel Workers of America Local 8031 ​​from 2005 to 2013.

“My story begins right here, in a foster home in Colorado, where a brave young couple tried their luck with a child no one wanted,” Tedesco said in a video posted Monday by his campaign. “They welcomed me and they showed me more love than I have ever known.”

A campaign video posted by Democrat Charles “Chaz” Tedesco’s campaign announces the Adams County Commissioner’s candidacy for Congress in Colorado’s new 8th District.


Renee Bernhard, co-founder and executive director of Foster Source, a Thornton-based nonprofit advocacy and support organization, praised Tedesco’s “tireless work” in support of foster care reforms in a statement provided by his campaign.

“Chaz has produced concrete results, including the creation of ‘Homes for Hope’, a facility for children in care to avoid being placed away from their biological families,” she said.

Maria Gonzalez, founder and CEO of Adelante Community Development, an Adams County nonprofit that works with Hispanic small business owners, said Tedesco has helped ensure the community has access to COVID-vaccines. 19.

“When vaccine funding became available, Chaz worked to make sure vaccines were available to underserved communities,” Gonzalez said in a statement provided by the campaign. “Through a team effort led by Chaz, more than 10,000 underserved residents of Adams County have been vaccinated.”

High praise and mixed reviews for the map adopted by Congress;  some challenges of the plan

An independent redistribution commission voted last week to pass a final map of the Congressional district that founds the 8th District of Colorado in the Adams County suburb north of Denver, stretching along Interstate 25 to in Greeley.

As drawn, the district is seen as competitive with a slight advantage to Democratic candidates, based on recent elections. President Joe Biden won the district over former President Donald Trump by 4.6 points, but Trump won the district by 1.7 points in 2016.

If approved by the Colorado Supreme Court, the new district would contain the highest concentration of Hispanic voters in the state at 38.5%. Several advocacy organizations argue the commission failed to meet legal requirements to reflect Hispanic and Latino influence in the state and are contesting the map.

Caraveo’s campaign spokesperson welcomed Tedesco in a statement to Colorado Politics.

US congressional candidate Yadira Caraveo accumulates legislative approvals

“Dr. Caraveo grew up in Adams County and has spent nearly a decade serving his community in Thornton as a pediatrician and, more recently, as a state legislator,” Elana Schrager said in a E-mail.

“Dr. Caraveo’s personal and professional experience – and her experience in getting things done – makes it clear that she is the person best prepared to advocate for families and communities in the 8th Congressional District.”

Colorado Politics reported on Friday that Republican Senators John Cooke, Kevin Priola and Barbara Kirkmeyer were considering running in the district.

The challenge to the congressional mapping plan on the protections of minorities has already been announced

At least two Hispanic advocacy organizations say they plan to challenge the card on the grounds that it dilutes minority voting rights.

Colorado Congressional Redistribution Commission adopts final map

Democratic state lawmaker Yadira Caraveo makes offer for new US House seat from Colorado

Democrat Joe Salazar says he won’t run in Colorado’s new congressional district


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Peer support aims to help first responders cope with stress at work https://www.smlxtralarge.com/peer-support-aims-to-help-first-responders-cope-with-stress-at-work/ Mon, 04 Oct 2021 03:45:51 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/peer-support-aims-to-help-first-responders-cope-with-stress-at-work/ TEXARKANA – Never show weakness. Keep it to yourself. Don’t take your work home. The list of “rules” that law enforcement officers and other first responders have traditionally followed is long. “For many years, law enforcement had a philosophy of doing nothing if something bothered you. You have to do your job and that was […]]]>

TEXARKANA – Never show weakness. Keep it to yourself. Don’t take your work home.

The list of “rules” that law enforcement officers and other first responders have traditionally followed is long.

“For many years, law enforcement had a philosophy of doing nothing if something bothered you. You have to do your job and that was part of it. No one talked about mental health,” the corporal said. Texarkana Arkansas Police Station. . Shawna Yonts.

“Talking about traumatic things you saw at work was seen as a sign of weakness. We weren’t supposed to show weakness, to other cops or outside,” Yonts said.

Yonts has been a police officer for 21 years and a crime scene investigator for over 12 of those years.

The stress of the job helped Yonts, along with Texarkana Arkansas Police Department Officer Scott Megason and former Bi-State Communications Manager Kelly O’Neill, start the Ark-Tex Peer Support organization.

“Scott and I have both been through a lot of traumatic events because of our jobs. We were talking about how before we retired we wanted to see something change. And that’s how it started,” Yonts said.

Ark-Tex peer support is for any law enforcement officer, prison officer, EMS, firefighter or dispatcher interested in peer support. It is to help them deal with and deal with stress, burnout or trauma that results from their work.

TAPD Chief Kristi Bennett was very supportive of the idea of ​​peer support.

“She’s very community-oriented and thinks our metal health will help us help the community,” Yonts said.

The group will focus on Miller County, Arkansas, and Bowie, County Texas, but neighboring agencies are welcome.

Similar peer support groups are starting across Arkansas and Texas.

“I was looking for courses for peer support and you can find them now when you google them,” Yonts said.

A training session prepared 23 TAPD agents to become peer support agents.

“We were a little embarrassed because of COVID, we would like about 30 out of 80 officers to end up taking the training,” Yonts said.

One of the best things about peer support is that it can cross state borders and agencies.

“One of the most important things that would make an officer reluctant to reach out to someone is the fear that they would know they were talking to someone,” Yonts said. “So in that case, they could ask for peer support from another agency or city. It doesn’t have to stop at their agency.”

Confidentiality is an integral part of the role of peer support worker. It is also a commitment and it requires a person to listen.

“It’s a huge engagement when six people call you in a week. Carrying something like a trauma is like carrying stones in a backpack. Talking to six people is like stones in six bags. back to back, ”Yonts said.

Since stress can also affect the officer’s entire family, the TAPD peer support team organized training for spouses and other family members.

The main objective of the support is to simply let an agent or a first responder know that he is not alone and that he is not weak if he is having difficulties.

“We want them to know that there is nothing wrong with how you are feeling,” Yonts said. “Personally, for me, there were things I would never talk about. I didn’t know how bad it was until I hit my brick wall.”

Anyone interested in receiving peer support or training to provide peer support can email [email protected] Where [email protected] or visit the Ark-Tex Peer Support Facebook page.

“We’ll find someone to talk to. Every time you say it out loud, it takes a little weight off you,” Yonts said.


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