Support Organization – SMLXtlarge http://www.smlxtralarge.com/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 04:25:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-5-150x150.png Support Organization – SMLXtlarge http://www.smlxtralarge.com/ 32 32 Indy Paramount charter school receives surprise $3 million donation. This is from MacKenzie Scott https://www.smlxtralarge.com/indy-paramount-charter-school-receives-surprise-3-million-donation-this-is-from-mackenzie-scott/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 04:25:46 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/indy-paramount-charter-school-receives-surprise-3-million-donation-this-is-from-mackenzie-scott/ Paramount Schools of Excellence recently received a surprise donation of $3 million, which will help the organization open two new schools next fall in South Bend and Lafayette. The financial donation, the largest received by the Indianapolis-based public charter school system, comes from billionaire philanthropist MacKenzie Scott. Over the past week, other schools across […]]]>

Paramount Schools of Excellence recently received a surprise donation of $3 million, which will help the organization open two new schools next fall in South Bend and Lafayette. The financial donation, the largest received by the Indianapolis-based public charter school system, comes from billionaire philanthropist MacKenzie Scott.

Over the past week, other schools across the country have announced massive donations from Scott, including $25 million to Chicago Public Schools and $18 million to Durham Public Schools in North Carolina.

The Paramount Schools network currently serves approximately 1,500 students in several Indianapolis neighborhoods – Brookside, Englewood and Cottage Home, as well as an online academy in partnership with the Indianapolis Public Schools District.

For years, Indianapolis has struggled to bring students up to grade level standards. In 2022, only three of Marion County’s 11 school districts had students who passed both the math and English portions of the ILEARN state standardized test. These scores were even lower for students who identified as black, Hispanic, learning English, or receiving special education services.

Paramount Schools, which enrolls at least 50% black students and at least 15% Hispanic students in its three physical schools, has produced some of the highest standardized test scores in the state while closing its gap in success. This means that the academic performance of black and Hispanic students is just as high as that of their white classmates.

Last week, IPS Superintendent Aleesia Johnson and school board members said they were ready to collaborate on a new school with Paramount. Families and local organizations pushed the district to help the network grow.

WFYI’s Elizabeth Gabriel spoke with Paramount Schools CEO Tommy Reddicks to learn how his schools have improved academic performance for students of color. This interview has been condensed and edited for clarity.


Elizabeth Gabriel: Over the past decade, Paramount has expanded to three school buildings, an online academy, and more than tripled its student population. What is your school model?


Tommy Reddicks: We don’t have a separate model at Paramount. What we really focus on is how do we work with our students to achieve Indiana academic standards. So looking at what we’re doing as a school, it’s kind of an old-fashioned approach to hard work and a strong data-driven work ethic. Although one thing I would say is different about our school model is that the students do the work. So if you walk into one of our classrooms, you will see a teacher teach for five to 10 minutes and then pass that teaching on to student work. And then that teacher will walk around and help the students work like a great coach, but the students will do the work for the majority of the time in class. So if you walk into our classrooms, they often look really boring because there’s no inspirational teacher giving that great long speech. There is heads down and work in progress and a teacher works quietly with individual students as they need a nudge or a little help.


Gabriel: It’s really interesting, it sounds like a cool model. I heard that some of your schools have animals on site. Which schools have goats and chickens and how does this help students learn?


Reddicks: We are big fans of urban farming. Myself – I grew up in rural Texas when I was young – we had goats, we had chickens, we had a garden, we canned vegetables. So having those experiences growing up really helped me create a love and a passion for that kind of work. And what we find with our very rigorous approach in our schools is that if we don’t balance all that classroom work with something experiential and fun, then everyone is going to burn out. And so we like to scaffold our environment for excitement. So you have a time for rigor and a time for excitement and that balance keeps everyone happy and eager to come back. Urban farms provide a great level of excitement, especially because it is not something that is simply accessible to our young people. And when you can give them that kind of extra joy and extra excitement that you won’t necessarily find elsewhere, it really catapults the system and keeps the energy going.

For example, two of our campuses, Paramount Brookside and Paramount Cottage Home, have urban farms. At Brookside Farm we have a resident herd of goats, we have chickens, we have bees. We have a large garden and a greenhouse, and we treat our goats and make our own cheese. We are a certified dairy in the state of Indiana, the smallest dairy in Indiana. We are approved by the Board of Animal Health to make a cheese product, which we are very passionate about and we sell this cheese locally in restaurants and grocery stores. Our Paramount Cottage Home campus also has a resident goat herd, cheese factory and large garden. And so this Paramount Cottage Home campus is relatively new. And so we’re still building the capacity of that farm, but still able to do a lot of the same things as the Brookside campus, and now we’re talking about our Paramount Englewood campus also incorporating an urban farm, and so we’re excited about these opportunities.


Gabriel: Philanthropist MacKenzie Scott has pledged to donate most of her billions of wealth to charity. She will give Paramount more than $3 million to build two more schools. How do you all specifically plan to use this money to support students and teachers?


Reddicks: Well, first of all, our organization is completely affected by the donation. It was overwhelming, to say the least, to hear that a national figure like MacKenzie Scott cared about the work we were doing and was willing to make such a significant donation to our organization. . We want to be very good stewards of this income, honor this gift and continue the passion, work and success that we already have. We were in an expansion position in South Bend and Lafayette, Indiana, to do a lot to subsidize the start-up of these schools with our own organizational revenue, and that was going to make things pretty tight. We know this $3 million donation will go a long way in helping us fund these startups in a way that will keep our cash position strong.

We will allocate it directly to the cost of expansion in our two new markets. In South Bend, it cost us $3.2 million to renovate the building given to us by the South Bend Schools Community Corporation, just to renovate this site. The cost of renovating our site in Lafayette was over $1 million. So there’s already $4 million in, you know, committed cash from our organization which, as I said, would have put us at a difficult point, and maybe even at a risky point during the expansion . And that income removes that risk and allows us to operate with more general fund flexibility.


Gabriel: Your schools have consistently outperformed Indianapolis on standardized tests. Why did you decide to open schools in South Bend and Lafayette when students of color in Indy still score low on state tests?


Reddicks: Such a good question. We are dedicated to every student we serve. And we’ve expanded into the Indianapolis area, as you mentioned earlier, tripling our presence – almost quadrupling because we now have four schools in the Indy area if you count our online academy. But what we find in the Indianapolis area [is] that if you go to open another school, you will probably bankrupt an adjacent school. The market became very saturated in terms of having more seats than children available, and we had to question our role as responsible stewards in the community. Is our role to bankrupt other schools or is our role to serve children well? Obviously, we’re on the side of option B – we don’t want to put other schools out of business. And so we wanted to see how we could expand our quest to provide more high-quality child seats without harming the current market. And that’s what led us to look outside of Indianapolis and explore other areas.

And we haven’t given up on offering more seats in Indianapolis. We are going to open another school. It will be a STEM-focused K-8 all-girls school in 2024 in the Indianapolis area. And we’re not going to say that’s all. But that’s all for now, because expansion is expensive and we need to make sure we’re doing well and that our schools are performing to a high standard before we consider additional places.


Gabriel: Our time is almost up, but is there anything else you would like to add before we leave?


Reddicks: I can just say that I’m really excited about the momentum we have. We now have 12 years of success, including a National Blue Ribbon [and] a national green ribbon. We have been an A school corporation for years and years and years.

I think there have been myths about charter schools and we are widely misunderstood. Many people think Paramount Schools are private schools, and they are not. We are free public schools. There are many people in the community who believe that charter schools are not accessible – that they are private, that they cost money or that they are selective. And we are none of that. In fact, if we have an empty seat and a parent walks in and says, “I want this empty seat for my child,” we have to give that seat to that parent, and we want it. We want to serve all children at all levels and abilities, and we are confident in our ability to grow them. But really, we’re trying to break that stereotype that we’re individualized and not for all parents. I think we prove time and time again that we can be a great educational solution for any parent.


Gabriel: Thanks for joining me, Tommy. I appreciate you chatting with me.


Reddicks: Absolutely, thank you.

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Arizona Recognizes Adoption Awareness Month https://www.smlxtralarge.com/arizona-recognizes-adoption-awareness-month/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/arizona-recognizes-adoption-awareness-month/ PHOENIX – Governor Doug Ducey proclaimed November 2022 Adoption Awareness Month in Arizona to highlight the importance of connecting children with loving families and raising awareness of organizations that support children in out care . “Every child deserves a safe and loving home with a forever family,” Governor Ducey said. “It takes the collaboration of […]]]>

PHOENIX – Governor Doug Ducey proclaimed November 2022 Adoption Awareness Month in Arizona to highlight the importance of connecting children with loving families and raising awareness of organizations that support children in out care .

“Every child deserves a safe and loving home with a forever family,” Governor Ducey said. “It takes the collaboration of the public, charitable, faith-based and business communities to expand opportunities for families and young people. This Adoption Awareness Month, we’re highlighting resources like the Children’s Heart Gallery to reinforce our commitment to helping children in care outside of the home connect with a safe and loving family. . We are committed to serving the children and families of Ariozna. My thanks to the Arizona Department of Child Safety and organization who have helped countless children in need.

Arizona has connected nearly 27,000 children to safe, permanent and loving homes through adoptions. The state is a leader in helping ensure better outcomes for Arizona children and families. Since 2016, the number of children placed in foster care has decreased by 30%, while maintaining safety as a number one priority. The state has also safely reunited nearly 45,000 children with their biological parents.

“We appreciate the service of adoptive families throughout the year, but National Adoption Month is an opportunity to salute their unwavering commitment to making a positive impact on the lives of children,” said the director of the DCS, Mike Faust. “It also gives us the opportunity to draw attention to the ongoing need to recruit adoptive parents and to encourage anyone interested in adopting or fostering a child to contact DCS to learn more about the process.”

This year, Governor Ducey signed legislation to keep more families together, increasing the family allowance. Grandparents and close relatives raising children in families will benefit from an increase in their monthly allowance, providing much-needed support to these selfless caregivers.

The bill joins another that allowed the Arizona Department of Child Safety (DCS) to create a fast track to licensing for parents. Licensed caregivers will have the same level of financial support as foster care providers.

The Arizona Children’s Heart Gallery features photos and biographies of adoptive children, with the goal of connecting them with loving families. To learn more about the adoption process, DCS offers orientation videos on his website.

View Arizona’s Adoption Awareness Proclamation HERE and lower.

***

WHEREAS the State of Arizona recognizes the importance of giving children who cannot be safely reunited with their biological families a permanent, safe and caring family through adoption; and

WHEREAS public and private agencies work with the courts, community members and members of faith-based organizations to unite children and adults through the adoption process; and

WHEREAS, We recognize that children thrive in safe, loving homes that provide family ties to sustain them into adulthood; and

WHEREAS adopting a child is a great joy and offers us an opportunity for collaboration between adoptive families and the communities that support them; and

WHEREAS, Caring individuals interested in adoption can visit the Arizona Department of Child Safety’s Children’s Heart Gallery website to learn more about Arizona children in need of a safe and permanent family environment; and

WHEREAS, Each successful adoption is more than a success for these children and their adoptive families, it is a story that all Arizonans can share; and

WHEREAS, Adoptive families and the children they live in and for whom they have provided permanency have a community that provides them with support and care to ensure that they are supported throughout their adoption.

THEREFORE, I, Douglas A. Ducey, Governor of the State of Arizona, do hereby proclaim November 2022 as

ADOPTION AWARENESS MONTH IN ARIZONA

and urge all citizens, communities and support organizations to renew our commitment to increasing the number of Arizona children who find permanency through a loving, adoptive family.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have affixed my signature and caused to be affixed the Great Seal of the State of Arizona

GOVERNOR

DONE at the Capitol of Phoenix, this seventh day of October in the year two thousand and twenty-two and the independence of the United States of America on the two hundred and forty-seventh.

ATTEST:

SECRETARY OF STATE

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Hiring of diversity and inclusion managers is on the rise https://www.smlxtralarge.com/hiring-of-diversity-and-inclusion-managers-is-on-the-rise/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 23:04:38 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/hiring-of-diversity-and-inclusion-managers-is-on-the-rise/ The last few years at Nike have been newsworthy – and not in a good way. There were complaints about leadership diversity and a toxic work environment and a lawsuit alleging sexual harassment and gender discrimination. Now the company’s director of diversity, equity and inclusion, or CDO, is leaving after six months on the job. […]]]>

The last few years at Nike have been newsworthy – and not in a good way. There were complaints about leadership diversity and a toxic work environment and a lawsuit alleging sexual harassment and gender discrimination. Now the company’s director of diversity, equity and inclusion, or CDO, is leaving after six months on the job. And he’s just one of many members of the DEI department to come out over the past two years. But it’s not just Nike, high CDO turnover is common.

After the assassination of George Floyd in 2020, companies have struggled to make diversity, equity and inclusion a more central part of how they do business. Janese Murray, president of Inclusion Impact Consulting, said one way to do this is to create diversity director positions.

“In some cases, without fully understanding what that means and what it takes to build that kind of culture,” she said.

A culture that prioritizes fairness in hiring, compensation and workplace dynamics.

Director of diversity and inclusion has been the second fastest growing job title over the past five years, just behind vaccine specialist, according to LinkedIn. And with growth comes a learning curve.

“Expectations are not completely realistic about what a person can do within an organization,” Murray said.

She said companies want instant results, but it takes at least five years to change a company’s culture.

And Patricia Pope, CEO of Pope Consulting, said many CDOs don’t have enough support, “whether it’s financial resources or additional human resources within the organization.”

CDOs often work alone, perhaps with an assistant, when they need a team. Stephanie Creary, a management professor at Wharton, said the lack of support can speak volumes.

“A lot of people see that the organization is unwilling to really do the work to come up with a strategy that will help them achieve those goals,” Creary said.

Even when companies are invested in the mission, the mission can be tiring. A lot of teaching is involved.

“There was still this little bubble above my head, like we’re really having this conversation again? But that’s what I had to do,” said Murray, who was CDO before becoming a consultant.

All of these explanations need to be provided before CDOs can tackle more visible changes, such as the customers companies accept, the products they sell, and the customers they connect with.

There’s a lot going on in the world. Through it all, Marketplace is there for you.

You rely on Marketplace to break down world events and tell you how it affects you in a factual and accessible way. We count on your financial support to continue to make this possible.

Your donation today fuels the independent journalism you rely on. For just $5/month, you can help maintain Marketplace so we can keep reporting on the things that matter to you.

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Area Coordinator – Syrian Arab Republic https://www.smlxtralarge.com/area-coordinator-syrian-arab-republic/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 10:44:04 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/area-coordinator-syrian-arab-republic/ PAC is an active NGO established in 2012, registered in Turkey, active in the NWS, with other small operations offices in Yemen and Sudan. In the NWS; PAC is a leading organization in the health and nutrition sectors through several core programs working to improve the resilience of crisis-affected communities in the NWS. CAP programs […]]]>

PAC is an active NGO established in 2012, registered in Turkey, active in the NWS, with other small operations offices in Yemen and Sudan.

In the NWS; PAC is a leading organization in the health and nutrition sectors through several core programs working to improve the resilience of crisis-affected communities in the NWS.

CAP programs have always aimed to build and support active health and nutrition systems in target areas by maintaining a high level of integration across multiple sectors and direct central services to facilitate service delivery that others actors manage in the NWS.

PAC fully applies the Principles of Protection from Sexual Exploitation and Abuse (PSEA) in all stages of its work, thus, PAC is strongly committed to creating a safe service delivery environment based on humanitarian principles and international humanitarian law. , free from all racism . PAC expects all current and future employees to commit to these principles.

• SERVICE: Program

• Position: Area coordinator

• REPORTS TO: Project Manager

• PLACE OF WORK: northwestern Syria

• LANGUAGE: Arabic, good in English

Technically and logistically follow the work of nutrition teams and ensure that services are delivered in the right way

Main responsibility and main support required:

– Oversee all project activities related to nutrition and health

– Oversee safe and effective management of nutrition, supplies and health equipment.

-Support the implementation of accurate and timely data collection, monitor data to ensure accuracy, and respond appropriately with changes needed to achieve goals and objectives.

-Assess training needs of nutrition and health staff and make appropriate referrals for training.

-Provide the teams with the available supplements and monitor their uses and documentation.

– Coordinate the development of the nutrition and health program with local actors and local health departments.

– Effective communication with local authorities and maintaining a good level of relations with bodies and institutions working in the project area

-Ensure the implementation of the organization’s code of conduct and policies

-Coordination and supervision of all humanitarian response activities in the work area

-SEND SUPERVISION REPORTS PERIODICALLY.

.

Qualifications:

  • Two years of humanitarian experience.
  • University degree in a related field.
  • 5 years in logistics and purchasing management
  • Experience in MS Office programs
  • Ability to work under pressure
  • Training courses in related fields.

Registration deadline: 16.11.2022

How to register

apply using the link: https://forms.gle/apwpPhAaCGMV7u6x7

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Local organization providing support and resources for female veterans https://www.smlxtralarge.com/local-organization-providing-support-and-resources-for-female-veterans/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 23:38:58 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/local-organization-providing-support-and-resources-for-female-veterans/ Florida is home to the second largest population of female veterans in the nation. More than 164,000 live in the sunshine state. A local group of women veterans started their own support group to connect with other women who served in the military. “As soon as I walked into the meeting, I felt like home. […]]]>

Florida is home to the second largest population of female veterans in the nation. More than 164,000 live in the sunshine state.

A local group of women veterans started their own support group to connect with other women who served in the military.

“As soon as I walked into the meeting, I felt like home. It was familiar,” said Jamela Browne, a veteran who served in the U.S. military from 2001 to 2004.

Since leaving the army, she has never been able to come into contact with other veterans.

Marine veteran Kimberly Homer said she also struggled to connect with other veterans. “I really didn’t have a support group until I joined Women Veterans Unite,” Homer said.

Women Veterans Unite is the only support group for women who have served in the military in Leon County. Their goal is to remind people that women are veterans too and to offer support and other resources to women who have served.

Rita Ann Schultz served in the United States Navy from 1974 to 1978. Schultz said being with other women who served is like nothing else. “There’s a connection there that you won’t find anywhere else,” Schultz said. “No matter what I mean, you’re just not going to find it.”

Women Veterans Unite started during the pandemic. After just two years of forming their group, they now have 115 local female veterans from all branches of the military involved.

“No matter what time it was, our experiences were very similar, so again, talking about these things, having a support group to talk about these things that you know makes it a lot easier because you have people who understand,” Browne said.

Group secretary Karen Bauer is glad the group has been able to help other women who have served. “It’s important for women because more and more women are entering the military, and they need resources and support specific to their issues,” Bauer said.

Resources like financial or housing assistance to employment assistance or, as Air Force veteran Beatrice Wolfe put it, just someone to talk to. “You talk about the camaraderie and being with other women who’ve been there, it’s amazing.”

Schultz said getting to know other female veterans had a positive impact on her life. “It was a very good thing to have at this point in life to have this connection with part of our youth, our military,” Schultz said.

Women Veterans Unite invites any woman who has served in the military to join its monthly meetings.

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man sentenced to more than 17 years in prison for trying to provide material support to the Islamic State | Takeover bid https://www.smlxtralarge.com/man-sentenced-to-more-than-17-years-in-prison-for-trying-to-provide-material-support-to-the-islamic-state-takeover-bid/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 14:45:24 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/man-sentenced-to-more-than-17-years-in-prison-for-trying-to-provide-material-support-to-the-islamic-state-takeover-bid/ A Pennsylvania man was sentenced yesterday to 208 months, more than 17 years, in federal prison, followed by lifetime supervised release, for attempting to provide material support to the Islamic State of Iraq and al -Sham, aka ISIS, a designated foreign terrorist organization. Mustafa Mousab Alowemer, 24, of Pittsburgh, pleaded guilty in the Western District […]]]>

A Pennsylvania man was sentenced yesterday to 208 months, more than 17 years, in federal prison, followed by lifetime supervised release, for attempting to provide material support to the Islamic State of Iraq and al -Sham, aka ISIS, a designated foreign terrorist organization.

Mustafa Mousab Alowemer, 24, of Pittsburgh, pleaded guilty in the Western District of Pennsylvania on September 16, 2021 to attempting to provide material support to ISIS as part of its plan to attack a church in Pittsburgh.

“Alowemer has admitted planning a deadly attack on a Pittsburgh church on behalf of ISIS,” said Assistant Attorney General Matthew G. Olsen of the Justice Department’s National Security Division. “The National Security Division was created to protect the nation from terrorist threats and we remain vigilant against those who would plot violent attacks on American soil as part of an extreme ideology.”

“The defendant’s plan to bomb a Pittsburgh church and risk death or injury to area residents in the name of ISIS was thwarted by the extraordinary work of the Pittsburgh Joint Terrorism Task Force,” the statement said. US Attorney Cindy K. Chung for the Western District. of Pennsylvania. “Our office will continue to hold accountable those who threaten the safety of our communities.”

“I would like to commend the excellent work of our Joint Terrorism Task Force, as well as that of their partners and sources, in successfully thwarting a planned terrorist attack in the name of ISIS,” the deputy director said. Robert R. Wells of the FBI Counterterrorism Division. “Alowemer’s plan to carry out an attack on a church in Pittsburgh and inspire other ISIS supporters in the United States failed thanks to the efforts of federal and state law enforcement officials. . This conviction demonstrates the commitment we share with our partners to prosecute those who violate our laws and seek to harm innocent people in our communities.

According to court documents, Alowemer conspired to bomb a church on the north side of Pittsburgh with an explosive device. His stated motivation for carrying out such an attack was to support the cause of ISIS and to inspire other ISIS supporters in the United States to unite and carry out similar acts in the name of ISIS. Islamic State. Alowemer also targeted the church, which he described as a “Nigerian Christian” church, to “take revenge on our [ISIS] brothers in Nigeria. Alowemer was aware that many people near the church could be killed by the blast.

As part of the plot to bomb the church, in May 2019, Alowemer distributed several instructional materials related to the construction and use of explosives and improvised explosive devices (IEDs) to an individual whom Alowemer thought he was another ISIS supporter, but was actually an FBI employee. Alowemer distributed these documents with the intention that the information be used in the assembly of a destructive device and in the pursuit of an attack in support of ISIS. In or around June 2019, Alowemer purchased several items, including nails and acetone (nail polish remover), with the belief that they were needed to assemble a destructive device and with the intention that they are used to make the explosives that would explode in the vicinity of the church.

Between April 16 and June 11, Alowemer met four times in person with an undercover FBI employee (UCE) and/or an FBI Confidential Human Source (CHS). At the June 11 meeting with UCE and CHS, Alowemer provided additional details about the bomb plot and provided the materials, including boxes of nails, he had purchased for the construction of the ‘device. Alowemer provided printed copies of detailed satellite maps from Google, which included handwritten marks identifying the church and arrival and flight routes. Alowemer also wrote and provided a handwritten 10-point plan outlining the details of his plot to personally deliver explosives in a backpack. Alowemer expressed a desire to meet once more to do the planning and coordination before proceeding with the attempted bombing in July 2019. This meeting was then scheduled for June 19 in the Pittsburgh area , at which time Alowemer was arrested.

Assistant U.S. Attorney Soo C. Song for the Western District of Pennsylvania and Attorneys Brenda Sue Thornton and S. Elisa Poteat of the National Security Division’s Counterterrorism Section are pursuing this case on behalf of the government.

Members of the FBI’s Joint Terrorism Task Force who were directly involved in this investigation include: FBI, US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), US Citizen and Immigration Services (USCIS), Homeland Security (HSI), IRS – Criminal Investigation, US Secret Service, US Postal Inspection Service, Pennsylvania State Police, Allegheny County Police Department, Pittsburgh Bureau of Police, Allegheny County Port Authority Police, Allegheny County Probation, University of Pittsburgh Police Department and UPMC Police Security.

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CU Denver partners with Steve Fund to provide mental health support for BIPOC students https://www.smlxtralarge.com/cu-denver-partners-with-steve-fund-to-provide-mental-health-support-for-bipoc-students/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 16:09:54 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/cu-denver-partners-with-steve-fund-to-provide-mental-health-support-for-bipoc-students/ As Colorado’s most diverse research university with students of color representing 43% of the student body, CU Denver understands the importance of providing support tailored to individuals’ experiences and needs. To help in this area, CU Denver is thrilled to announce a new partnership with the Steve Fund, a national organization comprised of colleges and […]]]>

As Colorado’s most diverse research university with students of color representing 43% of the student body, CU Denver understands the importance of providing support tailored to individuals’ experiences and needs. To help in this area, CU Denver is thrilled to announce a new partnership with the Steve Fund, a national organization comprised of colleges and universities, researchers, mental health experts, and others, focused on supporting the emotional well-being of young people. of color.

The Steve Fund’s efforts are determined and designed to address the significant mental health inequities and disparities faced by students of color across the country. In its analysis of current research, the organization found that:

  • Black students are much more likely than their white peers to say they tend to keep their feelings about the challenges of college to themselves.
  • Students of color are significantly less likely than white students to rate their campus climate as “excellent” or “good.”
  • Students of color are more likely to report feeling isolated and less likely to report feeling their campus is inclusive than white students.

Over the next two years, CU Denver will work with the Steve Fund team to improve the racial climate, policies, and practices on campus to prioritize the mental health and emotional well-being of students of color. . The partnership illustrates the importance of serving everything students and supports CU Denver’s 2030 Strategic Plan goal of becoming the nation’s premier equity-serving institution.

CU Denver priorities include:

  • Develop curriculum and needs assessments for CU Denver students of color.
  • Create an action plan that outlines ideas and measurable goals.
  • Implement policies, programs and practices developed with the support of Steve Fund experts and coaches.
  • Create evaluation and sustainability plans to ensure continued success.

As part of the initiative, the university will assemble a steering committee to work alongside Steve Fund staff. Faculty and students interested in serving on the Steering Committee should email Kristin Kushmider, PhD, Deputy Vice Chancellor for Health, Wellness, Advocacy and Support at kristin.kushmider@ucdenver .edu.

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Top Workplaces Top CEOs Share What Makes Their Leadership Success https://www.smlxtralarge.com/top-workplaces-top-ceos-share-what-makes-their-leadership-success/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 12:00:48 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/top-workplaces-top-ceos-share-what-makes-their-leadership-success/ CEOs don’t need to become BFFs with their employees, but it certainly helps if they’re BBFs – best bosses forever. These senior executives have apparently found ways to do this – by leading, listening to, respecting, supporting, appreciating and valuing their workers. They were selected by Energage, a Philadelphia-based research and consulting firm and Salt […]]]>

CEOs don’t need to become BFFs with their employees, but it certainly helps if they’re BBFs – best bosses forever.

These senior executives have apparently found ways to do this – by leading, listening to, respecting, supporting, appreciating and valuing their workers.

They were selected by Energage, a Philadelphia-based research and consulting firm and Salt Lake Tribune Top Workplaces partner, to receive leadership awards for large, medium and small businesses.

The 2022 winners are:

• Dan Burton, CEO of Health Catalyst, a healthcare analytics and data company in southern Jordan (now a three-time winner).

• Steve Sonnenberg, CEO of Awardco, a Lindon software provider for employee recognition efforts.

• Carrie Romano, CEO of Ronald McDonald House Charities of the Intermountain Area, a Salt Lake City facility that helps families with critically ill or injured children.

Here’s what each leader had to say about their leadership style, how they’re trying to improve, and what they hope to leave as a legacy for their organization.

Dan Burton, CEO of Health Catalyst

(Health Catalyst) Dan Burton, CEO of Health Catalyst.

What do you think makes your leadership style successful?

At Health Catalyst, we strive to be principle-centered in our leadership, consistently applying timeless principles, which leads to positive results in any situation in which these principles are applied. These principles include love or respect for each member of the team, recognizing their immeasurable value; humility and attentive and active listening with each member of the team; and servant-leadership, recognizing that leaders must be effective servants and supporters of each team member. We did not invent these principles, but have benefited greatly when we apply them.

What would you like to accomplish during your tenure?

I hope every day of my tenure as CEO – looking back 11 years and looking forward in the months and years to come – that our company is still focused and dedicated to our mission, and having built a company with customer relationships that produce financial strength, scalability and sustainability, and that we continue to be the best place to work with engaging team members at the forefront of the industry.

Is there a leadership skill you are still trying to master?

I can always refine and develop greater humility and love for my teammates. I will never finish developing these kinds of characteristics.

Steve Sonnenberg, CEO of Awardco

(Awardco) Steve Sonnenberg, CEO of Awardco

What do you think makes your leadership style successful?

Creating an authentic connection, overcoming challenges and continuously innovating have greatly contributed to Awardco’s success. I enjoy being personally involved in the ongoing work – from conducting sales calls to meeting with my employees to get to know them on a one-to-one basis. I recognize that surrounding myself with people whose strengths are my weaknesses plays a major role in creating a culture of success.

The very idea of ​​Awardco was born out of a challenge that I recognized. I think taking on challenges is the best way to create something that will truly solve a problem for people. I also think having a mindset that expects change and innovation is really important. Your first iteration will never be perfect. In fact, none of them will. Create something, release it, then keep improving it.

What would you like to accomplish during your tenure?

Recognizing good is one of Awardco’s values ​​for a reason. I am passionate about recognizing, creating and sharing the good in all aspects of life, and I want to have a positive impact on the lives of my employees and customers. Ultimately, I want to make the world a more supportive and caring place through the technology we’ve created.

Is there a leadership skill you are still trying to master?

Pivoting quickly is the name of the game in technology, and it’s never easy, especially if you have a particular idea of ​​how something should turn out. I’m improving and proud to move forward, but it’s a conscious decision I have to continually make in this ever-changing industry.

Carrie Romano, CEO of Ronald McDonald House Charities in the Intermountain area

(Ronald McDonald House Charities) Carrie Romano, President and CEO of Ronald McDonald House Charities of the Intermountain Area

What do you think makes your leadership style successful?

My leadership style is driven by purpose and people, and I love my job. Ronald McDonald House Charities, Intermountain Area is a non-profit charitable organization that provides families of pediatric patients with very real, practical support and compassionate care. We are a mission-based company. Our mission inspires me every day to become a more fearless and passionate leader. Our team is our most valuable asset and I’ve kind of surrounded myself with a truly exceptional team of professionals and volunteers. Their leadership and hard work inspires me to be a more authentic and effective leader. I strive for a leadership style that is both courageous and vulnerable. I love working alongside a team of mission-driven people to achieve big, ambitious goals, and I’m not afraid to fail. I believe that leadership is ultimately a support function. My job, as a leader, is to inspire, support and develop the potential of the wonderfully diverse and gifted people around me – to create more mission and better mission.

What would you like to accomplish during your tenure?

We are working hard to increase the impact of our mission to serve thousands more families with hospitalized children. We are expanding our professional team with the addition of three new bed and breakfasts to our Ronald McDonald House and three new Ronald McDonald Hospital Family Room programs (with nine combined overnight rooms). We are also working to improve the quality of support we can provide to families of patients with newly staffed positions to provide skilled mental health and bereavement support, and connect families to needed resources. As we evolve [up] our organization, I would like to gain the philanthropic support to keep and grow the strong team we have. During my tenure, I hope to have helped build a strong balance sheet and a mission-driven culture of excellence, inclusion and compassion. In the end, I’d like to leave it better than I found it, which each of us can do.

Is there a leadership skill you are still trying to master?

Yes! There are so many leadership skills that I strive to master. Leading in a hybrid work environment has created so many new challenges and opportunities. We do most of our work (and charitable work) in person. I don’t yet know how to maximize technology to advance our mission. I’m still learning which meetings are more effective in person, virtual or hybrid. On a personal level, the leadership qualities I am currently working on are patience, humility, listening and time management. It’s a journey.

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Seattle’s Forterra fires executive after tribe, investors and former employees speak out https://www.smlxtralarge.com/seattles-forterra-fires-executive-after-tribe-investors-and-former-employees-speak-out/ Tue, 25 Oct 2022 22:23:05 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/seattles-forterra-fires-executive-after-tribe-investors-and-former-employees-speak-out/ Seattle-based land conservation Forterra NW has fired a vice president following a tribal partner, investors and dozens of former staff alleging problems within the organization and calling for direction changes. Forterra terminated Tobias Levey “for cause” on October 21, “due to concerns that he could not responsibly or effectively serve the mission of the organization,” […]]]>

Seattle-based land conservation Forterra NW has fired a vice president following a tribal partner, investors and dozens of former staff alleging problems within the organization and calling for direction changes.

Forterra terminated Tobias Levey “for cause” on October 21, “due to concerns that he could not responsibly or effectively serve the mission of the organization,” according to a statement shared Monday by Forterra.

Levey was vice president of real estate transactions at Forterra. He helped lead a timber and housing initiative at the center of recent complaints from the Snoqualmie Indian Tribe and the Greater Tacoma Community Foundation.

His dismissal is one of the results of an effort by the organization “to uncover information to provide insight into Forterra’s process and protocols that could impact the success of the project,” the statement said.

Forterra did not share details on why Levey was fired. Levey, in an interview on Tuesday, said the exact cause was not explained to him.

“I acted with honesty and integrity at all times,” said Levey, who was Forterra’s third-highest-paid employee in 2020, the most recent year for which tax returns are available. “I acted responsibly and worked tirelessly for the benefit of the communities I served. I am very disappointed with this result and wish Forterra the best for its projects.

The organization has been rocked over the past month by cross-party criticism and demands for a change in leadership.

First, the Snoqualmie Tribe accused Forterra of misleading the tribe and the U.S. Department of Agriculture into securing a grant worth up to $20 million to help fund the ambitious initiative on timber and housing, which has attracted substantial political support and investment across the region.

The idea of ​​the initiative, called Forest to Home, is to harvest timber with sustainable methods on land owned by partners like the tribe, to create jobs in the town of Darrington, Snohomish County, there making wooden panels and using the panels to build housing in places. like Tacoma.

The tribe withdrew its support for the USDA grant, which the federal agency has tentatively approved but not yet disbursed.

Last week, the Greater Tacoma Community Foundation and the Seattle Foundation, which have each invested in Forterra’s work, raised concerns about the delayed status of a long-planned housing project in Tacoma’s Hilltop neighborhood. They demanded answers about their investments and urged Forterra’s board to replace the organization’s leadership team.

In addition, 80 former Forterra staff signed a letter expressing their solidarity with the Snoqualmie tribe. They described the organization as a ‘toxic, unstable and retaliatory workplace’ and called on the management team to be held accountable for ‘longstanding harmful conduct’.

Forterra’s total revenue was nearly $18 million in 2020, having more than tripled since 2015. King County Executive Dow Constantine served on the board of the for-profit arm of the organization, called Strong Communities Fund. Constantine left that board last week without publicly explaining why.

Forterra has deployed an outside entity, Angeli Law Group, to look into the claims of the Snoqualmie Tribe. That investigation is “nearing completion,” with findings expected this week, Forterra’s statement said Monday.

A review of Levey’s actions in particular is also underway, and Forterra is “embarking on a formal internal workplace review” in response to concerns raised by former staffers, the statement added.

“We do not take our commitments to project partners, community stakeholders and the extended Forterra family lightly,” the statement read.

Levey’s prior responsibilities are delegated to other staff and outside experts “to ensure that Forterra fulfills its commitments as transparently as possible,” according to Forterra’s statement.

The Snoqualmie Tribe did not immediately comment on Levey’s firing. The Greater Tacoma Community Foundation declined to comment.

News researcher Miyoko Wolf contributed to this story.

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What’s wrong with HB5414? https://www.smlxtralarge.com/whats-wrong-with-hb5414/ Sat, 22 Oct 2022 17:20:34 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/whats-wrong-with-hb5414/ Kimberly Fiorello and Ryan Fazio tell us they voted against the Reproductive Freedom Defense Act (HB5414) to protect patient safety. This bill, passed this year with bipartisan support, expands access to abortion in Connecticut by allowing certain non-physician clinicians to perform non-surgical (vacuum and medication) abortions during the first 12 weeks of pregnancy . This […]]]>

Kimberly Fiorello and Ryan Fazio tell us they voted against the Reproductive Freedom Defense Act (HB5414) to protect patient safety. This bill, passed this year with bipartisan support, expands access to abortion in Connecticut by allowing certain non-physician clinicians to perform non-surgical (vacuum and medication) abortions during the first 12 weeks of pregnancy . This convention is endorsed by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), the primary professional organization responsible for OB-GYN practice guidelines. ACOG does not consider these procedures to be surgery. Fifteen other states allow this practice and there is evidence in the medical literature for safety. This law will help reduce our state’s current two-week wait times for urgent medical care.

At the recent Round Hill Association debate, Ryan Fazio (timestamp 47:50) said that no medical organization testified in favor of HB5414, but Dr. Saud Anwar, a physician and state senator, noted from the Senate (timestamp 6:07:00), that the CT Department of Public Health, the American Public Health Association and ACOG all agree with the bill. In addition, the physician and chairman of the board of directors of Planned Parenthood of Southern New England testified in support of the bill (when it came to HB5261) in addition to supporting testimony from “gynecologists, medical assistants, advanced practice registered nurses (APRN) and midwives. ”

Ms. Fiorello and Mr. Fazio refer to fellow Democrats who voted against the bill with them during the recent debate. In truth, 17 Democrats voted no and 12 of their fellow Republicans voted yes. It’s important to recognize that most of the Democrats who opposed the bill did so primarily on the grounds of racial inequality — not security concerns — with a few of their colleagues telling a loaded story. disparate reproductive pressures on women of color.

Voters should consider this context when evaluating their lawmakers’ negative votes on HB5414.

Jennifer Barro, MD
Greenwich, Connecticut

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