Support Organization – SMLXtlarge http://www.smlxtralarge.com/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 22:20:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-5-150x150.png Support Organization – SMLXtlarge http://www.smlxtralarge.com/ 32 32 More benefits application support available for Native American veterans https://www.smlxtralarge.com/more-benefits-application-support-available-for-native-american-veterans/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 21:19:10 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/more-benefits-application-support-available-for-native-american-veterans/ Veterans who are members of the Navajo Nation now have more support options to pursue VA benefit claims. As of May 2, the Navajo Nation Veterans Administration is the first tribal organization recognized by VA to help Native American veterans with their claims for benefits. The application for recognition was initiated through the VA Tribal […]]]>

Veterans who are members of the Navajo Nation now have more support options to pursue VA benefit claims.

As of May 2, the Navajo Nation Veterans Administration is the first tribal organization recognized by VA to help Native American veterans with their claims for benefits. The application for recognition was initiated through the VA Tribal Representation Expansion Project aimed at expanding access to competent and qualified representation for Native American veterans.

Veterans who live on tribal lands and within tribal communities deserve access to representation regarding their VA benefit claims like any other veteran. The Tribal Representation Expansion Project will improve Native American representation while honoring tribal sovereignty by promoting pathways to certification within tribal communities.

Department of Defense statistics show that Native Americans serve in the military among the highest per capita rates compared to other ethnic groups. US Census Bureau data from 2017 shows there are more than 140,000 living Native American veterans. Additionally, Native American veterans are more likely to have a service-related disability than veterans of other races (30% to 23% respectively). Despite high enlistment and service connection rates, a lower percentage of Native American veterans, 41.6%, used at least one VA benefit or service, compared to 52.7% of veterans of other races. . This suggests that many Native Americans may not be aware that they are eligible for a wide variety of benefits and services available to all U.S. Army veterans.

VA established the Tribal Representation Expansion Project to expand access to comprehensive claims services for Native American veterans to ensure they pursue the benefits to which they are entitled. Through T-REP, VA aims to increase options for Native American veterans to receive assistance with their benefit claims when they present to VBA and the Board of Veterans’ Appeals.

For more information on VA benefits, you may be entitled to go to Benefits AZ. To learn more about specific VA benefits for Native American veterans, visit the Native American Veterans page. For tribal governments interested in participating in the T-REP, email OGCTREP@va.gov.

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Hundreds demonstrate for abortion rights in downtown Anchorage https://www.smlxtralarge.com/hundreds-demonstrate-for-abortion-rights-in-downtown-anchorage/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 04:45:44 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/hundreds-demonstrate-for-abortion-rights-in-downtown-anchorage/ A rallyman cheers for abortion rights as she listens to speakers at Saturday’s Abortion Rights Rally and March at Town Square Park in downtown Anchorage. (Emily Mesner/DNA) Hundreds of people marched through downtown Anchorage Friday and Saturday as they rallied in support of abortion rights after the Supreme Court struck down Roe v. Wade, allowing […]]]>

Hundreds of people marched through downtown Anchorage Friday and Saturday as they rallied in support of abortion rights after the Supreme Court struck down Roe v. Wade, allowing states to ban abortion and remove protections provided by the US Constitution.

“It is unacceptable that we have lost the right to have legal abortions in this country,” Laura Grande said as she waited for the start of Saturday’s march at the Delaney Park Strip. “My Body My Choice” was written on her stomach in black paint. “If all I can do is go out and walk and sing and paint my belly… I’ll try as hard as I can.”

Saturday’s abortion rights rally and march was organized by the Anchorage Socialism and Liberation Party and the nonprofit Stand Up Alaska. It came as supporters of women’s reproductive rights rallied in other communities across the state and country, and followed a Friday rally that began in Town Square Park.

After Roe, access to abortion in Alaska remains preserved under the state’s constitutional privacy protections and Alaska Supreme Court rulings. But in November, voters will be asked to decide whether a constitutional convention should be called — the first step on what abortion opponents see as the likeliest path to potentially amending Alaska’s Constitution to allow for a statewide ban.

[Dismay, joy and calls to action in Alaska after Supreme Court overturns Roe v. Wade]

Cynthia Gachupin, event planner and member of PSL, said they started planning Saturday’s rally about a month ago, after learning about the Majority Opinion Project leak. Gachupin said other events were also planned for future dates.

Fifteen-year-old activist Denali Gamache said she became involved in the movement after her mother found out she was being sexually abused by her father. Gamache was one of the speakers on Saturday.

“We need you to vote,” she shouted into a microphone. “Young activists and young people need you to vote for us because we can’t.”

His words stopped as hundreds of people chanted, “We’re going to vote.”

“I think it was really important because we have to be united in what we want and what we need,” Gamache said. “Because if we don’t have that, then other people are going to win.”

Gamache’s mother, Natasha Aġnaŋuluuraq Gamache, also spoke on Saturday and shared her story of homelessness and abuse.

“I have six children who were fathered by two different rapists,” she said. “So when I heard about the Dobbs vs. Jackson decision, which overturned Roe vs. Wade, all I could feel was instant fear because if I were to get pregnant again against my will, I would would have no recourse.”

Natasha Gamache, community organizer with Stand Up Alaska, called for solidarity and unity. She, along with other speakers, urged people to vote ‘no’ on whether a constitutional convention should be called.

Sydney Burns attended the rally and handed out information leaflets to those present. Burns is a nurse and works in health education and said she wanted to share her knowledge about reproductive health.

Burns has created a working resource document that provides general information about abortion rights and access. The pamphlets she distributed also included a QR code to a Facebook group aimed at creating a self-help network for community members to support those trying to access abortion.

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Marine Wing Support Squadrons Realign Under MACG-28 in Support of Force Design > U.S. Marine Corps Flagship > News View https://www.smlxtralarge.com/marine-wing-support-squadrons-realign-under-macg-28-in-support-of-force-design-u-s-marine-corps-flagship-news-view/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 19:32:45 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/marine-wing-support-squadrons-realign-under-macg-28-in-support-of-force-design-u-s-marine-corps-flagship-news-view/ CHERRY POINT, North Carolina — Marine Air Control Group 28 assumed command of the three Marine Wing Support Squadrons assigned to the 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing to modernize and improve capabilities in support of the Marine Corps Force Design Commander, June 1, 2022. The realignment unites the aviation command and control and ground support functions […]]]>

Marine Air Control Group 28 assumed command of the three Marine Wing Support Squadrons assigned to the 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing to modernize and improve capabilities in support of the Marine Corps Force Design Commander, June 1, 2022.

The realignment unites the aviation command and control and ground support functions under a single group headquarters within 2nd MAW.

The innovative realignment is an independent action of 2nd MAW, taking place parallel to similar efforts within 2nd MAW, and aligned with Aviation Force Design 2030 ground support initiatives. MACG-28 is the first operational command to merge AC2GS mission units under one commander.

“We have considerably diversified the composition of the group in terms of [military occupational specialties] who now reside here, and the missions that we are going to have to execute,” said Colonel Michael McCarthy, commanding officer of MACG-28. “Frankly, this is the biggest change this group has seen in its command relationships and command organization in its 79-year history, so it’s a really big deal for us.”

“Frankly, this is the biggest change this group has seen in its command relationships and command organization in its 79-year history, so it’s a really big deal for us.” Colonel Michael McCarthy, Commander of MACG-28

The consolidation will increase AC2GS capabilities in the 2nd MAW and II Marine Expeditionary Force, strengthen unity of command, and maintain relationships between Marine Aircraft Groups and geographically collocated MWSS units. MWSS and geographically co-located Maritime Air Command and Control System units will also implement mutually supportive relationships that will allow both types of units to capitalize on unique command and control and enabler capabilities. the other.

The realignment will also improve operational design in the Indo-Pacific region, inform institutional change and advance Force Design 2030.

“This is an exciting time for all Expeditionary Aviation Facilitators internal to MACG-28, and we are thrilled to get after this on behalf of the [commanding general] and continue to provide world-class air command and control support and world-class aeronautical ground support to America’s Airwing,” McCarthy said.

MACG-28 now consists of three MWSS, three aviation command and control squadrons, a low altitude air defense battalion and a communications squadron.

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MeckBetter Community Partnerships https://www.smlxtralarge.com/meckbetter-community-partnerships/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 02:03:44 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/meckbetter-community-partnerships/ MeckBetterTogether is a campaign that aims to maximize the efforts of child and family and community protection agencies to support families and keep children safe and well-being. The resources below include county and community partner resources that are available to residents. This list will be monitored and updated with the most recent information available. The […]]]>

MeckBetterTogether is a campaign that aims to maximize the efforts of child and family and community protection agencies to support families and keep children safe and well-being.

The resources below include county and community partner resources that are available to residents. This list will be monitored and updated with the most recent information available.

Photo of children walking in the grass

The Mecklenburg County Parks and Recreation Department (MCPRD) offers youth scholarships for families who cannot afford to attend summer camps and are not currently served by the scholarship or scholarship programs. exemption from existing fees.

Speak to the staff at your favorite recreation center for more information or to register.

Prevent Child Abuse NC (PCANC) remains true to its mission to ensure that preventing child abuse is a priority for North Carolina and that all communities have the knowledge, support, and resources to prevent child abuse. child abuse and neglect.

Pat’s Place Child Advocacy Center coordinates the investigation, treatment, and prosecution of the most serious cases of child abuse in Mecklenburg County. We provide a physical environment where the welfare of the child is our first priority and break the cycle of abuse through training, education and community outreach.

The Children’s Alliance is a network of approximately 40 public and private agencies in Mecklenburg County that collectively serve at-risk children and families in our community. Beyond information sharing and collaboration, The Children’s Alliance engages in a variety of public policy issues.

HealthyChildren.org provides advice on gun safety in the home. Did you know that nearly 2 million children live with unlocked and loaded guns at home? HealthyChildren.org is the only parenting website supported by 67,000 pediatricians committed to achieving optimal physical, mental and social health and well-being for all infants, children, adolescents and young adults.

Smart Start of Mecklenburg County is a private, nonprofit partnership that funds local programs for children ages 0-5 and their families. Smart Start of Mecklenburg County offers several programs for young children:

  • Ready4K
  • The basics of Mecklenburg
  • Dolly Parton Imagination Library

MECK Pre-K is a FREE, high-quality pre-kindergarten program for eligible four-year-olds in Mecklenburg County. Classrooms are located in four- and five-star child care centers across the county and are taught by licensed teachers and teacher assistants. MECK Pre-K was established in 2018 to improve access to quality early childhood care and education for children in Mecklenburg County.

Read Charlotte is a collaborative, community-wide initiative to double the percentage of grade three students reading at the grade level from 39% in 2015 to 80% by 2025. Read Charlotte builds collaborative partnerships and provides resources on proven practices and/or programs. Reading Checkup is a free online tool for families in Mecklenburg County to help children in kindergarten through 3rd grade stay on track with reading.

Raising Smart Girls is a science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) educational resource for parents of girls ages 3-12. Our mission is to demystify STEM for you and your daughters, and in doing so, inspire a generation of fearless and innovative female leaders. Try one of our carefully selected STEM activities from our activity database or check out the 150 resources in our home learning guide.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools (CMS) provides academic instruction and support to more than 143,000 students at 180 schools in Mecklenburg County. CMS offers a wide range of magnetic programs in 70 of its schools to develop the talents of students who have an interest and ability in specific areas. CMS also educates, supports and meets the needs of students with learning and physical disabilities.

When the Charlotte Mecklenburg Library and schools work together, everyone wins. All CMS students are automatically enrolled in the ONE Access program. Your student’s school ID is their library card! This means that any CMS can use their school ID to access a host of digital resources. We also offer virtual programming and a digital branch that you can access from home.

Communities In Schools (CIS) is the nation’s largest organization dedicated to empowering students to stay in school and on the path to a brighter future. Working directly inside schools, CIS connects students with caring adults and community resources to help them succeed inside and outside the classroom and reach their greatest potential.

Child Care Resources Inc. (CCRI) is a private, not-for-profit child care referral and resource agency that works with families to provide access to high-quality early learning and school-age opportunities. and affordable. CIRB provides access to our free child care finder, offers a child care subsidy to eligible families, and offers Early Head Start to help eligible families afford child care. children, high-quality health services and family support.

The Greater Charlotte Hope Line is a 24/7 helpline for Mecklenburg County residents seeking help with parental support, domestic violence and sexual assault. This free resource is confidential, safe, and staffed by highly trained advocates who have the knowledge and empathy to help those who call.

MeckHope is a collaborative initiative to bring urgent and preventative mental health and substance abuse/alcohol services to residents of Mecklenburg County.

The National Responsible Fatherhood Clearinghouse is a nationwide resource funded by the Office of Family Assistance (OFA) for fathers, practitioners, federal, state programs/beneficiaries, and the general public who serve or wish to support strong fathers and families. .

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Zippy Broughton joins GatorMade Service Trip in Greece https://www.smlxtralarge.com/zippy-broughton-joins-gatormade-service-trip-in-greece/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 17:20:57 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/zippy-broughton-joins-gatormade-service-trip-in-greece/ The Gators star will join 10 football players and five other female athletes. GAINESVILLE, Florida. – Zippy Broughton travels to Greece as a member of the 10-day GatorMade Service Trip, in conjunction with “The Smile of a Child”. The Smile of a Child is a recognized non-profit organization that provides services and support to children […]]]>

The Gators star will join 10 football players and five other female athletes.

GAINESVILLE, Florida.Zippy Broughton travels to Greece as a member of the 10-day GatorMade Service Trip, in conjunction with “The Smile of a Child”.

The Smile of a Child is a recognized non-profit organization that provides services and support to children living in poverty, who have experienced any form of abuse, who have health problems or who are missing. In response to the invasion of Ukraine, they created resources for refugee families to seek shelter, food, medical care and safety in Greece.

The Florida Athlete Contingent will support various organizational needs, such as resource set-up, medical services, food and lodging preparation, time with children, sorting and distribution donations, etc.

In addition to service work, the Gators will have time to explore local culture and historic sites in Athens and Santorini. Notable experiences will include visits to the Acropolis, Parthenon, Athens Stadium, exploring Oia Village, Akrotiri and more.

The trip, made possible through the support of the UAA and generous boosters, will give the athletes the opportunity to broaden their view of the world while helping those in need. Athletes will also be presented with the unique situation of overcoming the language barrier, immersing themselves in the language while experiencing authentic Greek culture throughout their stay.

Broughton will travel to Greece on Saturday June 18 and return to Gainesville on Monday June 27.

– #GoGator –

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Tricia Duncan Drops 3 DC Ward Council Race, Endorses Opponent https://www.smlxtralarge.com/tricia-duncan-drops-3-dc-ward-council-race-endorses-opponent/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 01:28:18 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/tricia-duncan-drops-3-dc-ward-council-race-endorses-opponent/ Placeholder while loading article actions Tricia Duncan, the DC Council nominee whom outgoing Ward 3 council member Mary M. Cheh had backed to succeed her, announced Monday night that she is dropping out of the race, with voting already underway and eight days to go. before polling day. In a letter, Duncan said she would […]]]>
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Tricia Duncan, the DC Council nominee whom outgoing Ward 3 council member Mary M. Cheh had backed to succeed her, announced Monday night that she is dropping out of the race, with voting already underway and eight days to go. before polling day.

In a letter, Duncan said she would instead back Matthew Frumin for the seat – and spoke out strongly against one of the other leading contenders, former council staffer Eric Goulet.

“I think two people have a real chance of winning. The candidate backed by a million dollars of outside money, special interest and Matt. This is a clear decision for me: I want Matt to win,” Duncan wrote, alluding to spending by the pro-Democratic charter school advocacy group for DC education reform and another pro-charter group, DC Charter School Action. No other organization has spent nearly as much this election cycle, and both support Goulet as well as incumbent Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D) and Council Speaker Phil Mendelson (D).

Goulet did not immediately respond to a request for comment Monday night. His main campaign goal has been a promise to dramatically increase the size of the city’s police force, but he’s also been backed by educational organizations who share his support for charter schools and the mayor’s strong control over the system. public school.

Duncan urged the other candidates in what was a nine-person Democratic primary — which includes the ward’s Democratic party chairman, several current and former ward advisory commissioners and a high school student — to also consider dropping out. She said she came to the conclusion she could not win after Friday’s campaign finance reports showed the extent of spending by outside groups to support Goulet, including direct mail and the online advertising purchased by these groups. “I don’t want a Ward 3 council seat to be bought. If there are other candidates who share these same values, it’s time to face reality,” she said in an interview.

Ballots were mailed to every DC voter in May and in-person early voting opened Friday. As of Sunday, at least 2,325 people had already voted at neighborhood drop boxes and polling places, along with countless more than 16,000 DC residents who returned their ballots by mail.

In a brief interview Monday night, Cheh said she hasn’t voted yet and hasn’t come to an immediate conclusion on who she will support with Duncan out of the race.

A stay-at-home mom and president of the Palisades Community Association before her campaign, Duncan launched her candidacy with strong fundraising days after Cheh announced in February that she would not seek another term. As of Friday, Duncan had raised more than any candidate except Frumin and former DC Library board member Monte Monash. She tried to establish intermediate positions on several issues such as policing and housing development.

In his analysis, Frumin has the best chance other than Goulet. “Matt crushed me on fundraising. He got endorsements from groups that actually give you volunteers,” Duncan said. “I obviously thought I would have been a great adviser. I embarked on this race to serve Ward 3 in the best possible way.

In a tweet, Frumin called Duncan’s stance “generous and brave.” Frumin has previously criticized DFER for its expenses in the Ward 3 race, but DFER DC’s state director said the group’s expenses reflect the wishes of many parents in the district.

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CREATE Project is planning a documentary at Memorial Park and is looking to get involved | News, Sports, Jobs https://www.smlxtralarge.com/create-project-is-planning-a-documentary-at-memorial-park-and-is-looking-to-get-involved-news-sports-jobs/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 05:27:52 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/create-project-is-planning-a-documentary-at-memorial-park-and-is-looking-to-get-involved-news-sports-jobs/ At the event, members of the local community, organizations, groups, families and children join in a Native American social dance circle. The CREATE project has announced an event at Dunkerque Memorial Park on July 30 from 1-3 p.m., to capture footage for the documentary film, “Tradition, trauma and tenderness.” The purpose […]]]>

At the event, members of the local community, organizations, groups, families and children join in a Native American social dance circle.

The CREATE project has announced an event at Dunkerque Memorial Park on July 30 from 1-3 p.m., to capture footage for the documentary film, “Tradition, trauma and tenderness.”

The purpose of the “Tradition, Trauma & Tenderness” the film is to educate communities about trauma; its impact on children; and how traditions, shared in a loving and nurturing environment, can help children heal and grow.

At the event, members of the local community, organizations, groups, families and children join in a Native American social dance circle. All community organizations that choose to participate will have the opportunity to be filmed with a sign allowing them to identify their organization and will be named in the credits of the documentary.

“The participation of our community members in this documentary, in such an important way, will show Chautauqua County’s commitment to eliminating child trauma, abuse and neglect. This event will also serve as a meeting place for children, parents, seniors, school administrators, faith communities and other community organizations to experience a sense of community through dance and tradition. , regardless of their age or cultural background. says Valerie Walawender, lead artist of the CREATE project, founder.

Footage will be captured by a ground videographer (Alex Simmons) and drone photography by Warrior Flight Team (licensed drone pilots). Light refreshments will be served and activities will be available between takes for children.

Press releases will be available at the event for anyone who chooses to attend. Once the film is completed, it will be made freely available to the public.

If you or your organization would like to participate in this event, please visit create-project.com to register.

The mission of the CREATE project is to encourage and support arts-based community initiatives aimed at helping our community break free from child trauma, abuse and neglect and become a place where children can flourish. We do this through arts-based collaborations, education, support and outreach. CREATE is an acronym for: “Empowering and empowering art for children across the globe.”



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Grassroots groups are leading the way to closing Colorado’s infant mortality gap https://www.smlxtralarge.com/grassroots-groups-are-leading-the-way-to-closing-colorados-infant-mortality-gap/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/grassroots-groups-are-leading-the-way-to-closing-colorados-infant-mortality-gap/ Rae Ellen Bichell AURORA, Colo. – As Britney Taylor visited the Mama Bird Maternity Wellness Spa during its grand opening this spring, she reflected on the birth of her first child: a confusing and lonely experience that resulted in an unplanned C-section and a long period of postpartum depression. But here in this Denver-adjoining town, […]]]>

AURORA, Colo. – As Britney Taylor visited the Mama Bird Maternity Wellness Spa during its grand opening this spring, she reflected on the birth of her first child: a confusing and lonely experience that resulted in an unplanned C-section and a long period of postpartum depression.

But here in this Denver-adjoining town, local families and smiling doulas wandered amidst a bright space echoing with upbeat music where mostly women of color can get massages, meet birth professionals and support groups, and attend classes on breastfeeding, childbirth and infant care. .

“It’s perfect,” Taylor said. Her next birth, she says, “will be completely different.”

About 12 miles away in northeast Denver, staff members at the Families Forward Resource Center were preparing a room where families who might have trouble getting to the doctor can easily meet with clinical staff about their medical questions. They were also preparing to hire a doula trainer to help increase the local number of birth support workers of color.

A primary goal of the two organizations is to reduce a significant health disparity in Colorado: Black, Hispanic, and Native American/Alaskan babies are dying at a higher rate than white and Asian/Islander babies. of the Pacific.

“Separated by race/ethnicity, our disparities are persistent and quite stark,” said Dr. Sunah Susan Hwang, a neonatologist at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

By several measures, including infant mortality, Colorado is considered one of the healthiest states. For every 1,000 live births, fewer than five babies die before they reach their first birthday, putting Colorado among about 15 states that have reached a threshold well ahead of the national 2030 goal.

Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention from 2003 to 2019, the largest range for which comparable data is available, shows the gap between infant mortality rates for non-Hispanic blacks and non-Hispanic whites has narrowed faster in Colorado than nationally. Colorado’s gap started wider than the national gap, but is now narrower.

But according to state health department data, only Asian/Pacific Islander and non-Hispanic white babies have met the 2030 goal. And despite a dramatic drop in mortality among black babies over the past 20 In recent years, their mortality rate, at around 10 deaths per 1,000 live births in 2020, remains well above the state average. Hispanic babies, meanwhile, are still dying at about the same rate as 20 years ago, with more than six deaths per 1,000 live births. (Data on Native American/Alaska Native babies were not always available because the numbers were too small to give meaningful rates.)

If black and Hispanic infants had the same infant mortality rate as non-Hispanic white infants in the state, about 200 babies would have been spared from 2018 to 2020 alone, according to an analysis of KHN data.

One of the main reasons babies die is because they are born too early. According to data from March of Dimes, Colorado was among 22 states where the disparity in preterm births between the most prosperous demographic groups and the rest of the population has worsened over the past five years. The state health department is clear on one important factor: racism.

“We know that racism and structural racism is one of the root causes that can contribute to this chronic stress in people’s lives that can contribute to prematurity, which can then lead to infant mortality,” said Mandy Bakulski. , responsible for the maternal and child welfare section. for the state health department.

Infant mortality is just one measure of health that disproportionately affects Black, Hispanic, and Native American/Alaska Native Coloradans: compared to other Coloradans, they are more likely to die of kidney disease, diabetes, covid-19, car accidents and other illnesses, according to the state health department.

Bakulski said that in recent years, state health officials have “reversed” their approach in response to community feedback on state infant mortality discrepancies and a multi-state project that studied a wide range of possible interventions. Bakulski’s team said the combination led them to conclude that “putting money in people’s pockets is a way to improve health outcomes.”

So the department has pushed the benefit of child tax credits that allow families to keep more of their income and is preparing to promote legislation that, starting in 2024, will give many Colorado parents three month of partially paid leave to care for a new child.

According to the March of Dimes — which tracks state efforts to reduce infant mortality and preterm birth — Colorado has achieved four of six policy actions supposed to improve maternal and child health, which are closely related. More importantly, he expanded Medicaid in 2013, which researchers say helps reduce infant mortality, though it’s unclear whether it helped narrow racial gaps.

“We give Colorado a ‘B.’ It’s much better than a lot of states — certainly better than the states that surround Colorado,” said Edward Bray, senior director of state affairs for March of Dimes. But there’s “room for improvement.” .

The organization expects an imminent change that will help: Colorado is temporarily expanding Medicaid eligibility, so more low-income women will have coverage for a year after giving birth, rather than the usual two months. The change is part of a package of laws passed last year that, among other things, elevated medical abuse during the perinatal period to a civil rights issue to be reported to the Colorado Civil Rights Commission.

However, advocates, researchers and professionals who work with families of color say the state can and should do more. First, they say, create a workforce of culturally competent health care providers, including doulas.

“Research has supported that doulas help achieve better overall birth outcomes, reduce preterm births, and reduce maternal and child mortality and morbidity,” said Bray, whose organization identified the access to doulas as one of Colorado’s major policy shortcomings.

However, Anu Manchikanti Gómez, a health equity researcher at the University of California, Berkeley who studies interventions, including doula care, designed to improve birth outcomes, said other options could also be crucial. While a doula plays an important role as a support person, navigator and advocate, she said, the doula is “a very downstream solution. It doesn’t really get to the root of the problem.

Gómez is interested in concrete interventions such as unconditional cash transfers to pregnant families. In Canada, researchers found that when impoverished pregnant Aboriginal women received a cash benefit of around $60 a month, it helped families meet their needs and reduced stress, and babies were less likely to born early or small.

Gómez is participating in a pilot study, the Abundant Birth Project, which pays a monthly cash supplement of about $1,000 to pregnant women in San Francisco who are black or Pacific Islander. The goal is to relieve the types of stress that can lead to premature birth.

Grassroots groups, on the other hand, address gaps in policy, acting as problem solvers in their communities while they wait for policy makers to catch up.

For example, Birdie, owner of Mama Bird Maternity Wellness Spa, is working with Colorado Access, one of the state’s Medicaid providers, to see if they can get doulas reimbursed for working with low-income families — one of Colorado’s major gaps. identified by March of Dimes. In Aurora, where the maternity ward is located, less than half of the residents are white.

“We serve women of color,” said Birdie, who goes by a name. “Our measure of success is happy mom, happy baby.”

Nearby, the Families Forward Resource Center received federal funding to support women prone to high-risk pregnancies and to train professionals who can assist with childbirth, breastfeeding, and postpartum care.

It’s run by people who know firsthand what it’s like to experience prejudice in healthcare, like Joy Senyah, whose son was born early and died within two days. His doctors ignored his heavy bleeding before birth, and after an emergency caesarean found he had been detached from the placenta for hours.

“Every time I asked he was turned down, ‘Ma’am, you’re fine,'” said Senyah, who was alone during the birth and covered by Medicaid. “When I look at the situation in hindsight, of course, I’m like, ‘Yeah, you should have known that. You should have raised hell.

She is now an outreach specialist for the resource center, working with her colleagues to ensure that babies of color have the same chance of surviving their first year as other babies. A big part of that is figuring out how to support families and give them access to lactation consultants, birth attendants and healthcare professionals who understand their clients – and are willing to help bring hell to them if necessary.

Methodology

KHN analyzed data from linked birth/infant death records from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s WONDER database for the years 2003-2006 and 2017-2019. To characterize the evolution of the gaps in infant mortality rates between blacks and whites during this period at the national level and in Colorado, three-year averages were calculated for each demographic group and the resulting rate for the period 2017-2019 was compared to the 2003-2005 rate.

For state specifics, data from 2000 to 2020 was provided by the Colorado Department of Health and Environment. Three-year rolling averages were calculated over this period for each demographic group.

To calculate excess mortality from 2018 to 2020, the three-year average infant mortality rate for white babies was subtracted from the three-year average infant mortality rate for black babies. The resulting excess infant mortality rate was multiplied by the sum of the three-year live births over that period and divided by 1,000.

Latoya Hill, senior policy analyst with KFF’s Racial Equity and Health Policy Program, identified appropriate analytical methods, and Tessa Crume, associate professor of epidemiology at the Colorado School of Public Health, confirmed the findings.

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The Washington Post is a founding partner of the Center for Media Integrity at the Organization of American States https://www.smlxtralarge.com/the-washington-post-is-a-founding-partner-of-the-center-for-media-integrity-at-the-organization-of-american-states/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 17:17:54 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/the-washington-post-is-a-founding-partner-of-the-center-for-media-integrity-at-the-organization-of-american-states/ Placeholder while loading article actions Here is a press release from the Organization of American States (OAS): OAS Launches Center for Media Integrity of the Americas The Secretary General of the Organization of American States (OAS), Luis Almagro, today launched the Center for Media Integrity of the Americas, a new center funded by voluntary donations […]]]>
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Here is a press release from the Organization of American States (OAS):

OAS Launches Center for Media Integrity of the Americas

The Secretary General of the Organization of American States (OAS), Luis Almagro, today launched the Center for Media Integrity of the Americas, a new center funded by voluntary donations to promote and support the practice of a independent journalism not affiliated with social interests. media production in the Americas.

In its early stages, the main activities of the Center will include:

  • Recurring seminars on journalism and social media for traditional and new media makers, hosted by the University of Maryland’s Philip Merrill College of Journalism
  • An annual awards program hosted by the OAS Secretary General
  • The Washington Post and Fundación Gabo (Gabriel Garcia Marquez Foundation), based in Cartagena, Colombia, are also founding partners of the Center, serving on the Council of Advisors and as convening centers, possibly hosting future activities.

Going forward, the Center will encourage other initiatives that recognize and support rigorous factual journalism and the dissemination of information on social media. The Center will also strive to expand its network of partnerships with journalists, media, universities and NGOs across the Americas who share the same values ​​and goals.

OAS Secretary General Luis Almagro said, “It is essential for the sustainability of any democracy that citizens have relevant and factual information to make the best possible decisions. This right is openly challenged by malicious stakeholders who misuse the multiple communication technologies available to us these days to spread disinformation and misinformation that promote their agendas at all costs. This threatens democracy in all our countries. Today, we are launching this Center for Media Integrity of the Americas to support the right to information of these citizens and invite all potential partners across the Americas to join us in this endeavour.

A Board of Directors will oversee the Centre’s fundraising activities. A separate, independent Council of Advisors will develop the awards program and help structure and support the seminar program. The full composition of the current Council of Advisors is available here.

The Center is launched as a project of the OAS General Secretariat, to be transformed into an independent non-profit organization.

The objectives and values ​​of the Center are intrinsically linked to the fundamental mandates of the OAS, such as the support and defense of democracy and human rights in the Americas, as reflected in the OAS Charter and the Inter-American Democratic Charter of the OAS.

The Center’s first executive director will be former US Ambassador to Panama John Feeley.

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Colonel Daniel Kramer returns to Battle Creek Air National Guard https://www.smlxtralarge.com/colonel-daniel-kramer-returns-to-battle-creek-air-national-guard/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 18:05:16 +0000 https://www.smlxtralarge.com/colonel-daniel-kramer-returns-to-battle-creek-air-national-guard/ Colonel Daniel Kramer II spent more than a decade in various roles at Battle Creek Air National Guard Base. On Saturday, Kramer returned to the 110th Wing and was introduced as its new commanding officer following a change of command ceremony at the Springfield base. “Most exciting to me is the tremendous potential for future […]]]>

Colonel Daniel Kramer II spent more than a decade in various roles at Battle Creek Air National Guard Base.

On Saturday, Kramer returned to the 110th Wing and was introduced as its new commanding officer following a change of command ceremony at the Springfield base.

“Most exciting to me is the tremendous potential for future growth that 110 Wing brings to the table,” Kramer said in a statement. “With extensive runway and ramp space and state-of-the-art growth missions, Battle Creek has all the infrastructure necessary to support nearly any new initiative within the Department of the Air Force.”

Col. Daniel J. Kramer II, 110th Wing commander, speaks during a 110th Wing change of command ceremony at Battle Creek Air National Guard Base in Springfield, Michigan, June 4, 2022 .

Kramer succeeds Col. Shawn Holtz, who has advanced to a new assignment at Michigan National Guard Joint Forces Headquarters in Lansing. Holtz has led 110 Wing Battle Creek since June 2019.

The 110th Air National Guard Wing at Battle Creek is one of three major Air National Guard bases in Michigan. Activated federally in 1947, the 110th provides intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance to various federal and state entities with the MQ-9 “Reaper” along with combat-ready personnel to support U.S. air forces in Europe and in Africa, as well as in emergencies. response in the state of Michigan.

MQ-9 Mower

During Holtz’s tenure as Wing Commander, the 110th Wing saw nearly 100 of its members activated to support Michigan State’s COVID-19 response, serving at food banks, testing sites, vaccination clinics and other locations across the state. In late 2021, dozens of unit members were activated to support Operation Allies Welcome, the largest noncombatant evacuation operation in US history following the fall of Afghanistan.

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